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If you are new to Moodle, take a look at our training course--Online Student Orientation: A Virtual Walk to Class--located in the navigation bar at the top of this screen. If you have questions about how to use Moodle, please stop by Wallace 222, send us an email at col@wvstateu.edu, or call us at 304-766-3300.

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About WVSU

Founded in 1891, West Virginia State University is a public, land-grant, historically black university, which has evolved into a fully accessible, racially integrated, and multi-generational institution.

The University, “a living laboratory of human relations,” is a community of students, staff, and faculty committed to academic growth, service, and preservation of the racial and cultural diversity of the institution.

With the goal of improving the quality of our students’ lives, as well as the quality of life for West Virginia’s citizens, the University forges mutually beneficial relationships with other educational institutions, businesses, cultural organizations, governmental agencies, and agricultural and extension partners.


Available courses

This 3 Credit Hours course provides an introduction into the functional disciplines of Business Administration: Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing and Information Systems. The course provides a survey of the disciplines and will assist a student in choosing an area of concentration studies leading to a degree in Business Administration. The course will begin to build the skills necessary for a successful career in Business.

BA 203. Business Statistics An introduction to various statistical measures, including central tendency, variation and skewness. Emphasis is also placed on concepts and functions of probability theory, such as the use of binomial and normal distributions. Students will use computer applications to demonstrate their understanding of various concepts. Prerequisite(s): MATH 120.

(3 Credit Hours) An introduction to the financial accounting cycle from analyzing economic events to financial statement preparation and use. The course also includes a basic study of the accounting for corporate assets, liabilities, and equities, as well as financial statement analyses. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 and MATH 120.
This 3-credit hour course is a survey of managerial accounting and decision making. The economic ideas underlying managerial planning and decisions, accounting for the various manufacturing environments, basic budgeting, short-term decision making, and capital allocation represent the topics of coverage.
To introduce students with the basic concepts in the organization and management of institutions. Emphasis is placed on managing in a contemporary context including planning, organizing, leading, and controlling while adjusting to change and maintaining effective performance.

(3 credit hours) The first in a three-course sequence providing students with a foundation in theory and a review of the accounting cycle, including preparing time-value money calculations and financial statements. The course includes an in-depth study of generally accepted accounting principles as they apply to cash, receivables and inventories. Comparisons with International Financial Reporting Standards will be introduced as appropriate.

Prerequisite: BA 216 with a grade of C or better.

This course is a survey of the history, organization, and function of the various components of the criminal justice system, which includes law enforcement, the courts, and corrections. The course includes an analysis of the decisions made in the justice process whereby citizens become suspects, suspects become defendants, and some defendants are convicted in turn becoming probationers, inmates, and parolees.
(3 Credit Hours) A study of the law of juvenile delinquency and the administration of the juvenile justice system. Examines the historical development of the concept of delinquency, and the special status of juveniles before the law. Surveys the major theories of delinquency. Considers the legal processing of abuse, neglect and dependency cases.
This course will provide students with a working knowledge of the major structures and basic legal concepts that underlie the Criminal Courts. The structure of the courts, the nature of the criminal law they apply, and the procedures followed by them will be examined along with the history of how they developed, and the goals they seek to achieve. The state and federal court systems will be examined. Prerequisite: CJ 101.

This course is designed to provide the instruction in the study of crimes, including major crimes, crimes against person, crimes against property, conspiracy, elements of proof, and the processes and procedures involved.

This course is designed to cover the issues related to the development of appropriate professional research techniques, document development, written and oral communications in law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Students will concentrate on the development of proper research skills involving professional and peer reviewed resources in various formats. The students will engage in a variety of criminal justice writing formats, including policy analysis, regulation creation, legislation development, and case studies. They will refine their utilization of a criminal justice style sheet.

(Three Credit Hours) This course is designed to provide the instruction in the study of crimes, including major crimes, crimes against person, crimes against property, conspiracy, elements of proof, and the processes and procedures involved. The primary emphasis is on various treatment theories available to help offenders more successfully reenter society.

This course combines economic theory with geography to address critical problems of growth, distribution, and development, along with their impact on international business. It introduces the student to the global economy in an era of shifting borders, restructuring economies, and regional realignments. Recent geopolitical changes are vividly portrayed in a series of superb full-color maps and striking photographs.

Principles of Microeconomics (3 credit hours) is an introductory course concerned primarily with the functioning of specific parts of the economy. This course covers the theory of consumer behavior and firm behavior under varying degrees of competition; the determination of price in both product and resource markets; and application of the theory to current microeconomic problems.

This course explores standard and emergent technologies related to effective instruction and administrative operations within a school. Reliable and effective web-based communication and modalities of e-learning are examined, including the development of a school technology plan. This course will provide students with both the theoretical and the practical considerations for planning and implementing technology in public education settings. This course is designed so that students will gain an understanding of the role of the principal in moving beyond short-term thinking and helping schools move forward with technology.

(3 credit hours) This course focuses on applying information on school needs as well as knowledge of local, state, and national policy to effective management practices. Students will learn how to legally and effectively manage school operations, including management of financial and human resources and how to schedule for the effective use of time and physical resources. This is an intense eight-week program that will allow you to learn what policies, procedures and technologies are in place for you to develop the proper allocation of resources.

This field-based practicum will allow candidates to apply knowledge of educational leadership, educational law and policy, change, innovation, professional development, financial and human resource management, and data-based decision making for school and district improvement.

This course emphasizes writing and reading as elements of active learning and critical thinking.
(3.00 credit hours) This course emphasizes writing and reading as elements of active learning and critical thinking. ENGL 101E is intended for students who are almost eligible for regular ENGL 101 sections as well as those who are eligible. Additional Requirement of a Minimum of 10 Contact Hours of supplemental instruction for any student enrolled in the course with an ACT score below 18. Must be completed within the first 60 hours of college credit.

This course will focus on the basic principles of effective document design and the tools for desktop publishing (DTP). The course will cover the basics of layout and design and how those principles are applied to various types of documents as well as integrating rhetorical concepts, particularly genres and modes of delivery, with the modern technology of desktop publishing.

Prerequisite: Art 101 and Eng. 102 or 112 with a final grade of “C” or higher.

(3 Credit Hours) This class is a continuation of Information Design I. Applying the theories and principles of information design learned in Information Design I, students will work on a client-directed project. Student will also learn about theories and principles of website design and practice creating and managing websites. Prerequisite: English 412 (Information Design I).

(3 Credit Hours) An introductory study of the discipline of health sciences, sports studies, health and physical education and the many factors that influence our health such as heredity, environment, health care services, and our own behavior. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of health education and health promotion to other disciplines, concepts of learning and behavior change, comprehensive school health programs, models and theories of human development and behavior with application to health education, competencies and skills of health educators, ethics, and current and future issues in health education. Students will also use the Internet to explore the various resources available to school and community health education/promotion specialists.

Designed to inform, interest and motivate students toward good health as it relates to effective, productive and satisfying living. We will look at health as a dynamic, ever-changing process of trying to achieve individual potential in the physical, mental, social, emotional, spiritual and environmental dimensions. 2 Credit Hours

(3 credit hours) This course examines and strongly considers the metabolic requirements needed for a variety of physical activity as well as the impact that physical activity, training and scientifically directed nutrition can have on one’s body composition and human performance.

(3 credit hours) This course is designed to be an introductory experience for the research consumer as well as the research producer in the health sciences. This course emphasizes developing conceptual understanding of using the scientific method as a means of problem solving, both as a critical consumer and as an entry-level researcher.

3 Credit Hour Course – An examination of the broad and challenging profession of community health education with an emphasis on communities and their health status. The course will also address the social/political reasons why many community health problems continue to exist.

3 Credit Hour Course – This course examines social issues and challenges in rural health with emphasis on morbidity and mortality status among rural populations, health disparities, health hazards, health care, environmental health and food insecurity. Prerequisite(s): HHP 354.

(3 Credit Hours) This course reviews basic principles in epidemiology and designs of study for health research. Prerequisite(s): Math 111 or 120.

(3 Credit Hours) Problem solving, number systems, logic, consumer math, basic algebra and geometry, basic probability and statistics.

(3 credit hours) Linear and quadratic equations; radical expressions; polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear programming; input / output models; applications to business and economics.

A detailed approach to portfolio development for the Regents Bachelor of Arts degree through the assessment of work and life experience. Students will learn to select, categorize and document various forms of personal and professional achievement and experiences. The course is required for anyone interested in pursuing the portfolio option in a specified academic content area.

(1 Credit Hour) A course designed to prepare adult learners for the transition back into academic study. In addition to strengthening career and life goal development, students will acquire management skills, appreciate support systems, and develop a plan of study. This course addresses specific issues and theories related to adult learners.

The course covers mathematical concepts relevant to the application of quantitative techniques in business. The basic concepts of finite mathematics, linear programming, and mathematics of finance are the focal points. Many of the topics discussed will involve computer applications.
Prerequisite: Math 120 – College Algebra (Formerly Math 101)


Introduction, definitions, social forces, classifications and sources of civil law. Fundamental principles of commercial law which relate to common business transactions and occurrences based upon contractual agreements. Theoretical and practical emphasis on the rights, duties, powers and privileges incident to oral and written contracts. Analysis of the essential elements of a valid and enforceable contract. Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENGL 101. (This course fulfills the General Education requirement in American Traditions)

(3 Credit Hours) An introduction to the financial accounting cycle from analyzing economic events to financial statement preparation and use. The course also includes a basic study of the accounting for corporate assets, liabilities, and equities, as well as financial statement analyses. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 and MATH 120.
To introduce students with the basic concepts in the organization and management of institutions. Emphasis is placed on managing in a contemporary context including planning, organizing, leading, and controlling while adjusting to change and maintaining effective performance.

This course is intended to be an introduction to the field of project management. It examines project management roles and environments, the project life cycle and various techniques of work planning, process controls and evaluations so as to achieve planned objectives. The role of a project manager throughout the live primary processes of managing projects will also be presented.

(Credit hours: 4) A comprehensive, issues based examination of the Earth’s environment, and humanity’s impact on it. Students will complete group discussions on various topics in environmental biology, and a laboratory experience consisting of a series of independent problems in environmental biology, in addition to mastering the standard lecture material. Does not count toward a major in Biology.

Environmental chemistry is the study and appreciation of the phenomena in the environment. In this course we look at various environmental issues from the viewpoint of the chemist and look at the political implications as well. The study of various environmental factors and pollutants in our water, soil and air and their effects on the planet. Includes laboratory work.

(3 Credit Hours) A study of the law of juvenile delinquency and the administration of the juvenile justice system. Examines the historical development of the concept of delinquency, and the special status of juveniles before the law. Surveys the major theories of delinquency. Considers the legal processing of abuse, neglect and dependency cases.

(3 Credit Hours) This course will examine the multifaceted problem of crime victimization. It focuses on the incidence of criminal victimization, social characteristics of crime victims, and the treatment of the victim by the Criminal Justice System. It also examines the efforts designed to alleviate the consequences of criminal victimization and provide support for the victim. This course is 100% online using the learning management system (LMS) available by clicking the WVSU online option on the main webpage www.wvstateu.edu. All course material will be available to students online.

(3 Credit Hours) This course will examine the multifaceted problem of crime victimization. It focuses on the incidence of criminal victimization, social characteristics of crime victims, and the treatment of the victim by the Criminal Justice System. It also examines the efforts designed to alleviate the consequences of criminal victimization and provide support for the victim. This course is 100% online using the learning management system (LMS) available by clicking the WVSU online option on the main webpage www.wvstateu.edu. All course material will be available to students online.

3 Credit Hours The study of the dynamics of racial prejudice in the United States and how it affects the criminal justice system. The relationship between minority status and criminality and the interaction of minorities with criminal justice organizations will be analyzed. Characteristics of female offenders are surveyed and offender classification systems are reviewed for their relevance to understanding motivational and behavioral patterns of female offenders. This course will explore the response of police and court officials to women as victims of crimes and will examine employment opportunities for women and minorities in the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CJ 101

3 Credit Hours - This course is a continuation of CJ 320 and is designed to cover the issues related to the creation of written documentation in the three major components of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Students will be introduced to the various formats, styles, and organizational patterns commonly utilized in criminal justice reports and research. Students will become aware of the writing recommendations, guidelines, and accrediting requirements of criminal justice organizations. Emphasis is also placed upon professional writing skills; including report structure and construction, mechanics, grammar, and specific criminal justice vocabulary and usage.

(Three Credit Hours) This course is designed to provide the instruction in the study of crimes, including major crimes, crimes against person, crimes against property, conspiracy, elements of proof, and the processes and procedures involved.

Principles of macroeconomics is a course designed to introduce students to basic principles of economic theory and policy. It presents economics as a systematic discipline that deals with the production and distribution of goods and services in a world with unlimited human aspirations but finite productive resources. The basic methods of thoughts and tools of analysis used by economists will be discussed. The student will be introduced to the important policy issues that make economics a lively and controversial field. This course has no prerequisites.
Principles of macroeconomics is a course designed to introduce students to basic principles of economic theory and policy. It presents economics as a systematic discipline that deals with the production and distribution of goods and services in a world with unlimited human aspirations but finite productive resources. The basic methods of thoughts and tools of analysis used by economists will be discussed. The student will be introduced to the important policy issues that make economics a lively and controversial field. This course has no prerequisites.
This course serves as an introduction to state and federal law and policy governing education systems. The course will explore historical and contemporary legal issues and their impact on student achievement and development of effective school practices, with focus on the role of the school principal, curriculum specialist, and district-level administrators.

This course will serve as an exploration of historical and current issues related to educational leadership, with an emphasis on legal and ethical issues including social justice, human rights, fairness, and equity. Students apply principles of leadership, ethics, and critical thinking while examining approaches to conceptualizing, interpreting, and making operational social justice.

This course emphasizes writing and reading as elements of active learning and critical thinking.
This course primarily focuses on research writing for a broad academic community. It covers basic research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and non-electronic sources, and techniques of formal writing. Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking skills.
An introductory course, with emphasis on the process of preparing various technical documents as well as methods of research, especially in the library. May substitute for ENGL 102 for majors in the college of natural sciences and mathematics. Prerequisite: English 101 or equivalent

(3 Credit Hours) English 150, Introduction to Literature, is a study of fiction, poetry, and drama. The course stresses a critical approach to basic themes, interpretations, and formal elements found in literature. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 101, (18 or better on ACT English or 450 on SAT Verbal or completion of developmental English, if required, with a grade of “C” or better).

First Year Experience is designed to help students develop the skills needed to be successful at WVSU and beyond. Course content includes developing college-level reading and study skills, career and major exploration, managing time and money wisely, building connections with faculty and students, awareness of campus and community resources, and increasing sensitivity to other cultures so students can effectively interact in an increasingly diverse and global community.

(3 Credit Hours) Problem solving, number systems, logic, consumer math, basic algebra and geometry, basic probability and statistics.

This course is a study of the basic rules of elements and their compounds. This allows you to develop an appreciation of the beauty of consumer chemistry. The course will involve a close look into the food we eat, the fuel we burn, and the products we use as health and beauty aids.
Thomas Kiddie

This is a lecture/discussion/creating course that starts with objects of art in the student’s environment and proceeds from the comfortable and familiar to the internationally accepted aesthetic. Periods of art history and cultures of the world will be examined. The student will be exposed to the basic concepts of art through the study of painting, sculpture, architecture, industrial art, fibers and film.

This is a lecture/discussion/creating course that starts with objects of art in the student’s environment and proceeds from the comfortable and familiar to the internationally accepted aesthetic. Periods of art history and cultures of the world will be examined. The student will be exposed to the basic concepts of art through the study of painting, sculpture, architecture, industrial art, fibers and film.

This is a lecture/discussion/creating course that starts with objects of art in the student’s environment and proceeds from the comfortable and familiar to the internationally accepted aesthetic. Periods of art history and cultures of the world will be examined. The student will be exposed to the basic concepts of art through the study of painting, sculpture, architecture, industrial art, fibers and film.

This is a lecture/discussion/creating course that starts with objects of art in the student’s environment and proceeds from the comfortable and familiar to the internationally accepted aesthetic. Periods of art history and cultures of the world will be examined. The student will be exposed to the basic concepts of art through the study of painting, sculpture, architecture, industrial art, fibers and film.

A combined lecture and studio course in which specific works from the past and present will be studied, analyzed, and used as a motivation for projects and discussion.

Designed to enhance your awareness of the visual world in which we live, this course will be a combination of lectures (visual presentations and films), discussions, and studio productions (your assignments and projects).

No prerequisites.

A combined lecture and studio course in which specific works from the past and present will be studied, analyzed, and used as a motivation for projects and discussion.

Designed to enhance your awareness of the visual world in which we live, this course will be a combination of lectures (visual presentations and films), discussions, and studio productions (your assignments and projects).

No prerequisites.

A combined lecture and studio course in which specific works from the past and present will be studied, analyzed, and used as a motivation for projects and discussion.

Designed to enhance your awareness of the visual world in which we live, this course will be a combination of lectures (visual presentations and films), discussions, and studio productions (your assignments and projects).

No prerequisites.

A combined lecture and studio course in which specific works from the past and present will be studied, analyzed, and used as a motivation for projects and discussion.

Designed to enhance your awareness of the visual world in which we live, this course will be a combination of lectures (visual presentations and films), discussions, and studio productions (your assignments and projects).

No prerequisites.

(3 credit hours). A survey of the origins and character of the visual arts from the Renaissance to the contemporary art world.

As manifestations of human ideas, the visual arts are central to understanding a culture or an historical era.   While it is impossible to authentically reconstruct the past, a contextualized understanding of the historical development of Western arts and ideas will provide vital sense to the organization of our present dominant culture. It will aid in explaining the formation of artistic ideas, myths and traditions which continuously affect our concepts of art, and it will demonstrate the close correlation between a society's power structure and its definitions of artistic purpose and values.

Prerequisites:  English 101 & 102


The course provides an introduction to the functional disciplines of Business Administration: Accounting, Finance, Management and Marketing. The course provides a survey of the disciplines and will assist a student in choosing an area of concentrated studies leading to a degree in Business Administration. The course will begin to build the skills necessary for a successful career in business.

The course provides an introduction to the functional disciplines of Business Administration: Accounting, Finance, Management and Marketing. The course provides a survey of the disciplines and will assist a student in choosing an area of concentrated studies leading to a degree in Business Administration. The course will begin to build the skills necessary for a successful career in business.

Study of the tasks involved in the marketing of goods and services by both for-profit and nonprofit enterprises. Provides an overview of marketing mix decision requirements within a framework of contemporary economic, social, technological, competitive, and regulatory influences. Prerequisite(s): ECON 201 and 202.

Analysis of the environment and the managerial functions of recruiting, employee assessments and development, retention, and employee relations with the enterprise, with emphasis on the relationships among people, on group interactions, on relations, and on relations between employers and employees. 


The purpose of this 3 Credit Hours course is an overview of basic concepts of personal finance. We will be concerned with formulation and implementation of payment methods, whether to afford loan for measuring credit capacity debt payments-to-income ratio and debt-to-equity ratio, computing unit prices, cost of renting, purchasing and insurance coverage, selecting investments, and retirements.

This 3 Credit Hours course explores the many dimensions of new venture creation and growth and to foster innovation and new business formations in independent and corporate settings. We will be concerned with content and process questions as well as with formulation and implementation issues that relate to conceptualizing, developing and managing successful new ventures

(3 Credit Hours) This course primarily focuses on the research writing process for a broad academic community. It covers basic research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and nonelectronic sources and techniques of formal writing. Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking skills.  Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101.

(3 credit hours) An introduction to different types of securities, markets, transaction costs, security regulations, and taxes. From the viewpoint of an individual investor, students investigate stocks, bonds, money markets, instruments, options, futures, and mutual funds, with detailed analysis of risk/return, pricing, and value.

An international management survey course focusing on the nature and scope of global trade and investment, the role of multilateral institutions including the World Bank, International Monetary Fund (IMF), and World Trade Organization (WTO), the international monetary system and exchange markets, and differences in national cultures in providing the environment in which trade and investment take place. Additionally, the course focuses on the impacts that this environment has on the operating decisions of international and multinational enterprises, especially with respect to the development of global strategies and their effect on business functions such as management, marketing, finance, and operations. Prerequisite: completion of BA 301.

This course introduces the fundamental concepts and analytical tools that are used in the field of management information systems (MIS).  The primary objectives are to provide the student with a broad overview of the field of MIS and to enable development of competence in MIS decision-making. Students learn about many core issues in MIS including types of information, human-computer interaction, supply chain systems, business intelligence, and the e-commerce implications in information systems.  The course also discusses key aspects of international information systems.


(Credit hours: 4) A comprehensive, issues based examination of the Earth’s environment, and humanity’s impact on it. Students will complete group discussions on various topics in environmental biology, and a laboratory experience consisting of a series of independent problems in environmental biology, in addition to mastering the standard lecture material. Does not count toward a major in Biology.


3 Credit Hours This course presents a comprehensive overview of Corrections as a “system” and is a review of the philosophical and historical roots of punishment as well as contemporary developments. Particular attention will be paid to Twentieth Century developments and evolving trends in the Twenty - First Century. Prerequisite: CJ 101

(3 Credit Hours) This course will examine the multifaceted problem of crime victimization. Focuses on the incidence of criminal victimization, social characteristics of crime victims, the treatment of the victim in the criminal justice system and efforts designed to alleviate the consequences of criminal victimization and provide support for the victim. Prerequisite(s): CJ 101.

3 Credit Hours The study of the dynamics of racial prejudice in the United States and how it affects the criminal justice system. The relationship between minority status and criminality and the interaction of minorities with criminal justice organizations will be analyzed. Characteristics of female offenders are surveyed and offender classification systems are reviewed for their relevance to understanding motivational and behavioral patterns of female offenders. This course will explore the response of police and court officials to women as victims of crimes and will examine employment opportunities for women and minorities in the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CJ 101

(3 Credit Hours) This course is designed to cover the issues related to the development of appropriate professional research techniques, document development, written and oral communications in the criminal justice system, law enforcement, courts and corrections. Students will concentrate on the development of proper research skills involving professional and peer reviewed resources in various formats. The students will engage in a variety of criminal justice writing styles, including policy analysis, regulation creation, legislation development and case studies. They will refine their utilization of a criminal justice style sheet. In addition to writing skills, attention will be given to the development of effective professional oral communication techniques in the areas of conversation, interviewing, sworn depositions, evidence and expository speaking. Prerequisite(s): CJ 223, 224, 226; also ENG 102 and COMM 100; all with a grade of C or better.

This course examines organizational and management theories as they apply to criminal justice agencies and organizations. Different management styles, practices and problems are discussed. Also covered are the structure, purpose and process of the criminal justice system and policy making in justice administration. Prerequisite(s): CJ 101, 223, 224, 225, 226, 307, 308, 313, 315, 322, 380 and senior standing.

This course is a study of the topic of sex crimes, paraphilia’s, and the investigation of sex crimes, the methodology of sex crimes and the relations of sex crimes to other deviant and criminal activity. Topics will focus on violent sexual offenders including typical typologies of such offenders and theories related to sex crimes


This course will introduce the student to the study of homicide/murder including the history and types of homicide/murder. The methodology of the investigative process of homicide/murder will include many aspects of homicide/murder including crime scene investigation, modus operandi, sources of information, procedures, interrogation, and criminal profiling.

This course will introduce the student to the various definitions and degrees of homicide/murder as well as the patterns and trends. To further enhance the student’s understanding of homicide/murder, this course will incorporate interdisciplinary knowledge from the fields of criminology, sociology, history, psychology and political science.


(3 Credit Hours) A practical humanistic approach to interpersonal, small group and public communications. Focus is on the communicative event and its context with special emphasis on communication principles and skills.

(3 Credit Hours) This course looks at mass communications and the media and how it impacts our daily lives. Students will explore many areas of communications including radio, television, movies, books, music, the internet and more.

3 credit hours. Course emphasis will be placed on recognition and special needs students labeled “exceptional” according to state and federal regulations. Effective instructional strategies for teaching populations such as “gifted”, and “students at risk” for school failure, visually impaired, physically challenged, speech/language handicaps, and behavior disorders will be studied. PREREQUISITE: Education 202 with a “C” or better.

Curriculum development in areas which reinforce content, social, and vocational learning for individuals with EMI, SLD and Multi-categorical. A field experience of 30 clock hours is required.

This course explores standard and emergent technologies related to effective instruction and administrative operations within a school. Reliable and effective web-based communication and modalities of e-learning are examined, including the development of a school technology plan. This course will provide students with both the theoretical and the practical considerations for planning and implementing technology in public education settings. This course is designed so that students will gain an understanding of the role of the principal in moving beyond short-term thinking and helping schools move forward with technology.

(3 credit hours) This course focuses on applying information on school needs as well as knowledge of local, state, and national policy to effective management practices. Students will learn how to legally and effectively manage school operations, including management of financial and human resources and how to schedule for the effective use of time and physical resources. This is an intense eight-week program that will allow you to learn what policies, procedures and technologies are in place for you to develop the proper allocation of resources.

(3.00 credit hours) This course emphasizes writing and reading as elements of active learning and critical thinking.

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This course primarily focuses on the research writing process for a broad academic community. It covers basic research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and non-electronic sources and techniques of formal writing. Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking
skills. Prerequisite(s): ENGL101.
This course primarily focuses on the research writing process for a broad academic community. It covers basic research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and non-electronic sources and techniques of formal writing. Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking
skills. Prerequisite(s): ENGL101.

(3 Credit Hours) A study of fiction, poetry and drama through selected works of world literature. The course stresses basic themes and formal elements found in literature. Prerequisite: English 101 eligibility and completion of English 098, if you were required to take it, with a grade of “C” or above.


3 Credit Hours

An introduction to music for the non-major through historical survey and the development of listening skills. The individuals in the class will expect to understand the basic elements of music in order to develop competence in the aural analysis of music. The development of music will be examined in the light of historical events, and will be integrated with developments in the other arts, literature, and the humanities.


(3 Credit Hours) English 150 is a study of poetry, fiction, and drama through selected works of world literature. The course stresses basic themes and formal elements found in literature. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 Placement.

(3 Credit Hours) A study of American literary tradition from the Colonial Period through the Civil War. Prerequisites: ENGL 150 and 250

English 324 is a survey course that examines concepts, principles, issues, and resources in the field of children’s literature. It is designed primarily for those students who will be teaching a literature-based curriculum at the elementary and middle school levels, but is not limited to them. The course is organized around topics/themes relevant to the literature with an overview of assigned materials. We will consider strategies for introducing specific materials in the classroom. While this course has an international component, most of the books examined are written from the English-speaking world. 3 Credit Hours; Prerequisites, English 102 and 150.

2 Credit Hour Course - Designed to inform, interest and motivate students toward good health as it relates to effective, productive and satisfying living. We will look at health as a dynamic, ever-changing process of trying to achieve individual potential in the physical, mental, social, emotional, spiritual and environmental dimensions

2 Credit Hour Course - Designed to inform, interest and motivate students toward good health as it relates to effective, productive and satisfying living. We will look at health as a dynamic, ever-changing process of trying to achieve individual potential in the physical, mental, social, emotional, spiritual and environmental dimensions

(3 credit hours) This course is designed for current Sport Study Majors who are future fitness professionals interested in helping individuals, communities, and groups gain the benefits of participating in regular physical activity in a positive and safe environment. This course includes guidelines for laboratory testing used in a health and fitness setting and for exercise programming both in healthy populations and in populations with special needs.

This course reviews dietary principles and behavior modification in overall health, as well as how to develop nutrition education interventions within community health programming. Prerequisite(s): BIO 303.

([3 Credit Hours])This course focuses on the economic and political maturation of the United States from Reconstruction through the present. The influence of industrialization and increased government activity on the increasingly diverse American people and foreign powers is studied in the context of worldwide imperialism, the Gilded Age, Progressivism, World Wars and the Civil Rights movement in the American Century. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 102.

A brief survey of the African and Caribbean heritage followed by a more extensive study of the African in American History from 1619 to date. Appreciable emphasis will be placed on social, economic and political developments since 1954.

(3 credit hours) Linear and quadratic equations; radical expressions; polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear programming; input / output models; applications to business and economics.

3 Credit Hours

An introduction to music for the non-major through historical survey and the development of listening skills. The individuals in the class will expect to understand the basic elements of music in order to develop competence in the aural analysis of music. The development of music will be examined in the light of historical events, and will be integrated with developments in the other arts, literature, and the humanities.


3 Credit Hours

An introduction to music for the non-major through historical survey and the development of listening skills. The individuals in the class will expect to understand the basic elements of music in order to develop competence in the aural analysis of music. The development of music will be examined in the light of historical events, and will be integrated with developments in the other arts, literature, and the humanities.



3 Credit Hours An introduction to international politics in the late 20th and early 21st century. The course covers historical developments altering power relationships among nation-states in foreign policy, the interaction of developed and non-developed nations and problems confronting international organizations and transnational actors. Prerequisite(s): Pass ENGL 102 with C.

A general survey of principles, theories and fields of psychology with emphasis on application. (Course is designed for the student who wishes to gain a greater understanding of human behavior, both adaptive and nonadaptive.) Prerequisite(s): eligibility for ENGL 101.

Dynamics, development and problems of human adjustment with emphasis on the normal personality. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 151.

A review of the history of psychology, including a survey of the philosophical and scientific antecedents of contemporary psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 151.

This course is a study of the etiology, classification and treatments of abnormal behavior in childhood and adolescence. Prerequisite: PSYC 151.

A general survey of the discipline, its methods, basic concepts and area of study. The course examines man’s organization and institutional life, the social process of socialization, conflict and its resolution and social change.

A general survey of the discipline, its methods, basic concepts and area of study. The course examines man’s organization and institutional life, the social process of socialization, conflict and its resolution and social change.

This course is designed to explore how gender is constructed and how the pervasiveness of gender is a way of structuring social life. Sociology of gender involves both the study of femininities and masculinities, the cultural meaning associated with being women and men in our society, how gender influences the interaction between people, how the structures of our societal institutions, such as organization of work, and education create gendered meanings, and how the meaning of gender changes overtime. Prerequisite SOC 101 or permission of the instructor.

(3 Credit Hours) 

This course discusses the ways that families, communities, societies, and international organizations enhance social welfare (or wellbeing) in the evolving global era. It draws on a variety of theoretical perspectives that inform social welfare thinking and discusses the policies and practices that have evolved in different countries over the years to promote people’s wellbeing. These practices are implemented by different agents and are shaped by culturally embedded institutions. Agents include administrators, social workers, and volunteers as well as organizations, such as nonprofits and government agencies. The major social welfare institutions include the family community support networks, philanthropy, the market, and the state. The family and community networks are often referred to as nonformal institutions while philanthropy, the market, and the state are regarded as formal institutions. Together, agents, interventions, and institutions comprise a complex nexus of welfare provision that functions at the local, national, and international levels. However, we caution improvements in social welfare do not occur automatically, but involve a process of struggle that engages with the realities of politics and power. It requires that the way power is exercised at the local, national, and global levels is understood.