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Welcome!

If you are new to Moodle, take a look at our training course--Online Student Orientation: A Virtual Walk to Class--located in the navigation bar at the top of this screen. If you have questions about how to use Moodle, please stop by Wallace 222, send us an email at col@wvstateu.edu, or call us at 304-766-3300.

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About WVSU

Founded in 1891, West Virginia State University is a public, land-grant, historically black university, which has evolved into a fully accessible, racially integrated, and multi-generational institution.

The University, “a living laboratory of human relations,” is a community of students, staff, and faculty committed to academic growth, service, and preservation of the racial and cultural diversity of the institution.

With the goal of improving the quality of our students’ lives, as well as the quality of life for West Virginia’s citizens, the University forges mutually beneficial relationships with other educational institutions, businesses, cultural organizations, governmental agencies, and agricultural and extension partners.


Available courses

(3 Credit Hours)  This is a lecture/discussion/creating course that surveys objects of art in the student’s environment and proceeds from the comfortable and familiar to the international. The course uses lecture, discussion, and student participation to introduce the basic concepts of Art and Art History.


This 3 Credit Hours course provides an introduction into the functional disciplines of Business Administration: Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing and Information Systems. The course provides a survey of the disciplines and will assist a student in choosing an area of concentration studies leading to a degree in Business Administration. The course will begin to build the skills necessary for a successful career in Business.

BA 203. Business Statistics An introduction to various statistical measures, including central tendency, variation and skewness. Emphasis is also placed on concepts and functions of probability theory, such as the use of binomial and normal distributions. Students will use computer applications to demonstrate their understanding of various concepts. Prerequisite(s): MATH 120.

Analysis of the environment and the managerial functions of recruiting, employee assessments and development, retention, and employee relations with the enterprise, with emphasis on the relationships among people, on group interactions, on relations, and on relations between employers and employees.

(3 Credit Hours) A study of cost and managerial accounting procedures and concepts as applied to service and manufacturing enterprises. Prerequisite(s): BA 216.

The course introduces concepts related to the development and delivery of the e-commerce component of a business enterprise. Many of the topics discussed will involve computer applications and practical examples. Prerequisites: BA 216, BA 301, BA 305, C S 106 or permission.

This course is a study of the basic rules of elements and their compounds. This allows you to develop an appreciation of the beauty of consumer chemistry. The course will involve a close look into the food we eat, the fuel we burn, and the products we use as health and beauty aids.
This course is a survey of the history, organization, and function of the various components of the criminal justice system, which includes law enforcement, the courts, and corrections. The course includes an analysis of the decisions made in the justice process whereby citizens become suspects, suspects become defendants, and some defendants are convicted in turn becoming probationers, inmates, and parolees.
(3 Credit Hours) A study of the law of juvenile delinquency and the administration of the juvenile justice system. Examines the historical development of the concept of delinquency, and the special status of juveniles before the law. Surveys the major theories of delinquency. Considers the legal processing of abuse, neglect and dependency cases.
This course presents a comprehensive overview of Corrections as a “system” and is a review of the philosophical and historical roots of punishment as well as contemporary developments. Particular attention will be paid to Twentieth Century developments and evolving trends in the Twenty-First Century. Prerequisite: CJ 101.
This course will provide students with a working knowledge of the major structures and basic legal concepts that underlie the Criminal Courts. The structure of the courts, the nature of the criminal law they apply, and the procedures followed by them will be examined along with the history of how they developed, and the goals they seek to achieve. The state and federal court systems will be examined. Prerequisite: CJ 101.

This course combines economic theory with geography to address critical problems of growth, distribution, and development, along with their impact on international business. It introduces the student to the global economy in an era of shifting borders, restructuring economies, and regional realignments. Recent geopolitical changes are vividly portrayed in a series of superb full-color maps and striking photographs.

Principles of Microeconomics (3 credit hours) is an introductory course concerned primarily with the functioning of specific parts of the economy. This course covers the theory of consumer behavior and firm behavior under varying degrees of competition; the determination of price in both product and resource markets; and application of the theory to current microeconomic problems.

This course will serve as an overview of leadership theories and their application in the interest of school improvement. This is an introductory course in educational leadership. Focus will be on school and district level leaders and their roles in the learning process within the greater learning community.

This course prepares prospective educational leaders to administer various school programs for diverse student populations. Emphasis will be given to basic concepts, issues, regulations, problems and procedures in the management of special and compensatory education. Also included will be state and federal legislation and court decisions pertaining to special pupil populations and career and technology education.

This course emphasizes writing and reading as elements of active learning and critical thinking.
This course primarily focuses on research writing for a broad academic community. It covers basic research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and non-electronic sources, and techniques of formal writing. Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking skills.

(3 Credit Hours) This course helps students improve their writing by reviewing the rules of grammar, usage, and mechanics. Systematic attention is given to sentence construction, punctuation, spelling, vocabulary development, and self-help through effective use of the dictionary. Emphasis will be placed on the use of such skills in practical, everyday communication. (English 160 cannot be substituted for English 101 or 102.)

(3 Credit Hours) This class will teach a rhetorical approach to information design. Using the rhetorical principles of audience, purpose, and context, the course will analyze the layout of documents and discuss effective layout and design. The course will include discussions of theories and principles of information design, but the course will be mainly activities-based in which students will work on their own projects applying the knowledge acquired through readings and lecture. The course assumes that the student already has a good understanding of computers. It is strongly recommended that students take English 228, Introduction to Desktop Publishing, or the equivalent, prior to enrolling in the course. Prerequisite: English 112 (Technical Writing).


(3 credit hours) Linear and quadratic equations; radical expressions; polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear programming; input / output models; applications to business and economics.

(3 credit hours) Linear and quadratic equations; radical expressions; polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear programming; input / output models; applications to business and economics.

A detailed approach to portfolio development for the Regents Bachelor of Arts degree through the assessment of work and life experience. Students will learn to select, categorize and document various forms of personal and professional achievement and experiences. The course is required for anyone interested in pursuing the portfolio option in a specified academic content area.

(1 Credit Hour) A course designed to prepare adult learners for the transition back into academic study. In addition to strengthening career and life goal development, students will acquire management skills, appreciate support systems, and develop a plan of study. This course addresses specific issues and theories related to adult learners.

This course is a study of the basic rules of elements and their compounds. This allows you to develop an appreciation of the beauty of consumer chemistry. The course will involve a close look into the food we eat, the fuel we burn, and the products we use as health and beauty aids.

This course is intended to introduce students to the History of the United States, from the earliest civilizations of more than 10,000 years ago, but primarily beginning with the European settlements in the late 1400’s, through the Civil War and Reconstruction periods.

Thomas Kiddie

This course explores change theory and its application to the school setting. Candidates will identify and explore emerging trends and issues in the change process with emphasis on sustaining innovation through reculturing and ongoing professional learning and development.

This course focuses on applying information on school needs as well as knowledge of local, state, and national policy to effective management practices. Students will learn how to legally and effectively manage school operations, including management of financial and human resources and how to schedule for the effective use of time and physical resources. This is an intense eight-week program that will allow you to learn what policies, procedures and technologies are in place for you to develop the proper allocation of resources.

This course will provide students with a working knowledge of the major structures and basic legal concepts that underlie the Criminal Courts. The structure of the courts, the nature of the criminal law they apply, and the procedures followed by them will be examined along with the history of how they developed, and the goals they seek to achieve. The state and federal court systems will be examined. Prerequisite: CJ 101.

3 Credit Hour Course - This course examines current thinking on a variety of issues influencing public policy, treatments and the discourse surrounding major health issues today.  Books and articles providing students with a diversity of viewpoints regarding contemporary health issues and the complexity surrounding these issues, will be reviewed.  Emphasis is placed on the development and refinement of skills involving critical thinking, reasoning, and effective argument as they relate to health issues at both macro and micro scales of consideration.