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If you are new to Moodle, take a look at our training course--Online Student Orientation: A Virtual Walk to Class--located in the navigation bar at the top of this screen. If you have questions about how to use Moodle, please stop by Wallace 222, send us an email at col@wvstateu.edu, or call us at 304-766-3300.

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About WVSU

Founded in 1891, West Virginia State University is a public, land-grant, historically black university, which has evolved into a fully accessible, racially integrated, and multi-generational institution.

The University, “a living laboratory of human relations,” is a community of students, staff, and faculty committed to academic growth, service, and preservation of the racial and cultural diversity of the institution.

With the goal of improving the quality of our students’ lives, as well as the quality of life for West Virginia’s citizens, the University forges mutually beneficial relationships with other educational institutions, businesses, cultural organizations, governmental agencies, and agricultural and extension partners.


Available courses

(3 credit hours) This course is designed to be an introductory experience for the research consumer as well as the research producer in the health sciences. This course emphasizes developing conceptual understanding of using the scientific method as a means of problem solving, both as a critical consumer and as an entry-level researcher.

(3 Credit Hours)  This is a lecture/discussion/creating course that surveys objects of art in the student’s environment and proceeds from the comfortable and familiar to the international. The course uses lecture, discussion, and student participation to introduce the basic concepts of Art and Art History.


This 3 Credit Hours course provides an introduction into the functional disciplines of Business Administration: Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing and Information Systems. The course provides a survey of the disciplines and will assist a student in choosing an area of concentration studies leading to a degree in Business Administration. The course will begin to build the skills necessary for a successful career in Business.
The course covers mathematical concepts relevant to the application of quantitative techniques in business. The basic concepts of finite mathematics, linear programming, and mathematics of finance are the focal points. Many of the topics discussed will involve computer applications.
Prerequisite: Math 120 – College Algebra (Formerly Math 101)


(3 Credit Hours) An introduction to the financial accounting cycle from analyzing economic events to financial statement preparation and use. The course also includes a basic study of the accounting for corporate assets, liabilities, and equities, as well as financial statement analyses. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 and MATH 120.
This 3-credit hour course is a survey of managerial accounting and decision making. The economic ideas underlying managerial planning and decisions, accounting for the various manufacturing environments, basic budgeting, short-term decision making, and capital allocation represent the topics of coverage.
To introduce students to the basic concepts in the organization and management of institutions. Emphasis is placed on managing in a contemporary context including planning, organizing, leading, and controlling while adjusting to change and maintaining effective performance.

(3 Credit Hours) A study of cost and managerial accounting procedures and concepts as applied to service and manufacturing enterprises. Prerequisite(s): BA 216.

(3 credit hours) An integrative capstone course focusing on presenting and understanding of the nature, formulation and implementation of strategy as it applies to firms and the environment in which they operate. The emphasis is on integrated organizational activities, encompassing top divisional, functional and operational levels, and including perspectives from marketing, accounting, human resources, leadership, policy, ethics and other functional areas of management. Computer simulations, case analysis, and participation in class will develop students’ skills in critical decision-making, collaborative efforts, and formal oral and written reports.

Prerequisites: Completion of 90 credit hours and all other core courses. Department chair or faculty advisor permission required.

(3 credit hours) This course recognizes the importance of understanding the dynamics of diversity in modern organizations around the world in terms of clientele, human resource and ownership. To equip managers for the challenges of global demands emphasis is on strategic, socio-cultural, behavioral, legal-political, ethical issues as well as on the functional aspects of international management.
Prerequisite: BA 310.

The course introduces change management as a framework that has evolved from a focus on process improvement using statistical tools to a comprehensive framework for managing a sustainable business. The course also surveys the analytic tools and techniques which are useful in the design and operation of sustainable systems from supply networks to distribution channels. The material is taught from a managerial perspective, with an emphasis on where and how specific tools can be used to improve the overall performance, reduce the total cost, while increasing the sustainability of the firm’s value chain.

Prerequisite: BA 301 and ENGL 20


(Credit hours: 4) A comprehensive, issues based examination of the Earth’s environment, and humanity’s impact on it. Students will complete group discussions on various topics in environmental biology, and a laboratory experience consisting of a series of independent problems in environmental biology, in addition to mastering the standard lecture material. Does not count toward a major in Biology.

This course is a study of the basic rules of elements and their compounds. This allows you to develop an appreciation of the beauty of consumer chemistry. The course will involve a close look at the food we eat, the fuel we burn, and the products we use as health and beauty aids.
This course is a survey of the history, organization, and function of the various components of the criminal justice system, which includes law enforcement, the courts, and corrections. The course includes an analysis of the decisions made in the justice process whereby citizens become suspects, suspects become defendants, and some defendants are convicted in turn becoming probationers, inmates, and parolees.
(3 Credit Hours) A study of the law of juvenile delinquency and the administration of the juvenile justice system. Examines the historical development of the concept of delinquency, and the special status of juveniles before the law. Surveys the major theories of delinquency. Considers the legal processing of abuse, neglect and dependency cases.
This course presents a comprehensive overview of Corrections as a “system” and is a review of the philosophical and historical roots of punishment as well as contemporary developments. Particular attention will be paid to Twentieth Century developments and evolving trends in the Twenty-First Century. Prerequisite: CJ 101.

3 Credit Hours - This course is a continuation of CJ 320 and is designed to cover the issues related to the creation of written documentation in the three major components of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Students will be introduced to the various formats, styles, and organizational patterns commonly utilized in criminal justice reports and research. Students will become aware of the writing recommendations, guidelines, and accrediting requirements of criminal justice organizations. Emphasis is also placed upon professional writing skills; including report structure and construction, mechanics, grammar, and specific criminal justice vocabulary and usage.

(3 credit hours) This course is designed as a capstone experience for all seniors in the criminal justice major. The course content will vary slightly with each offering. The course will basically cover in-depth analyses of problems and issues in the criminal justice system. The course also will provide students with information about opportunities for employment in the criminal justice field and graduate school. The course will use up-to-date texts and articles from professional journals. Students will be required to complete a major research paper on a topic chosen by the student and approved by the instructor. Successful completion of the course with a grade of “C” or better is required for graduation.

This course combines economic theory with geography to address critical problems of growth, distribution, and development, along with their impact on international business. It introduces the student to the global economy in an era of shifting borders, restructuring economies, and regional realignments. Recent geopolitical changes are vividly portrayed in a series of superb full-color maps and striking photographs.

Principles of Microeconomics (3 credit hours) is an introductory course concerned primarily with the functioning of specific parts of the economy. This course covers the theory of consumer behavior and firm behavior under varying degrees of competition; the determination of price in both product and resource markets; and application of the theory to current microeconomic problems.

This course will serve as an overview of leadership theories and their application in the interest of school improvement. This is an introductory course in educational leadership. Focus will be on school and district level leaders and their roles in the learning process within the greater learning community.

This course prepares prospective educational leaders to administer various school programs for diverse student populations. Emphasis will be given to basic concepts, issues, regulations, problems and procedures in the management of special and compensatory education. Also included will be state and federal legislation and court decisions pertaining to special pupil populations and career and technology education.

This field-based practicum will allow candidates to apply knowledge of educational leadership, educational law and policy, change, innovation, professional development, financial and human resource management, and data-based decision making for school and district improvement.

(3.00 credit hours) This course emphasizes writing and reading as elements of active learning and critical thinking. ENGL 101E is intended for students who are almost eligible for regular ENGL 101 sections as well as those who are eligible. Additional Requirement of a Minimum of 10 Contact Hours of supplemental instruction for any student enrolled in the course with an ACT score below 18. Must be completed within the first 60 hours of college credit.
(3 credit hours) This course primarily focuses on the research writing process for a broad academic community. It covers basic research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and nonelectronic sources and techniques of formal writing. Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking skills.
(3 credit hours) This course primarily focuses on the research writing process for a broad academic community. It covers basic research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and nonelectronic sources and techniques of formal writing. Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking skills.

(3 Credit Hours) This course helps students improve their writing by reviewing the rules of grammar, usage, and mechanics. Systematic attention is given to sentence construction, punctuation, spelling, vocabulary development, and self-help through effective use of the dictionary. Emphasis will be placed on the use of such skills in practical, everyday communication. (English 160 cannot be substituted for English 101 or 102.)

First Year Experience is designed to help students develop the skills needed to be successful at WVSU and beyond. Course content includes developing college-level reading and study skills, career and major exploration, managing time and money wisely, building connections with faculty and students, awareness of campus and community resources, and increasing sensitivity to other cultures so students can effectively interact in an increasingly diverse and global community.

Designed to inform, interest and motivate students toward good health as it relates to effective, productive and satisfying living. We will look at health as a dynamic, ever-changing process of trying to achieve individual potential in the physical, mental, social, emotional, spiritual and environmental dimensions. 2 Credit Hours

3 Credit Hour Course – This course will examine the current thinking on a variety of health issues. Timely articles that provide students with a variety of points of view regarding health and the complexity of the issues involved will be used. Emphasis will be placed on the development of skills in critical thinking, reasoning, and effective argument.


This course is an introductory study of the various theories used in health education & health promotion and their applicability to health programming.

(3 Credit Hours) Problem solving, number systems, logic, consumer math, basic algebra and geometry, basic probability and statistics.

(3 credit hours) Linear and quadratic equations; radical expressions; polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear programming; input / output models; applications to business and economics.

A detailed approach to portfolio development for the Regents Bachelor of Arts degree through the assessment of work and life experience. Students will learn to select, categorize and document various forms of personal and professional achievement and experiences. The course is required for anyone interested in pursuing the portfolio option in a specified academic content area.

(1 Credit Hour) A course designed to prepare adult learners for the transition back into academic study. In addition to strengthening career and life goal development, students will acquire management skills, appreciate support systems, and develop a plan of study. This course addresses specific issues and theories related to adult learners.

(3 credit hours) An introduction to research methods in educational settings. This course will allow students to determine how data can be used to make instructional decisions at the classroom, building, and district level.

This field-based practicum will allow candidates to apply knowledge of educational leadership, educational law and policy, change, innovation, professional development, financial and human resource management, and data-based decision making for school and district improvement.

(3 credit hours) This is a practical course in action research. Students will conduct an action research project based on an identified need in a public school setting and present it to their peers.

This course is a study of the basic rules of elements and their compounds. This allows you to develop an appreciation of the beauty of consumer chemistry. The course will involve a close look into the food we eat, the fuel we burn, and the products we use as health and beauty aids.
Thomas Kiddie

An introduction to the basic technical and aesthetic elements of the art of film. The class will examine the nature of cinema and its relation to our culture and our lives through analysis of its many components

Try new things in this course. There's no way to mess it up. 

3 Credit Hours. The study and applications of formats, style and organizational patterns essential in various professions, with particular emphasis on correspondence, reports, research and audience analysis. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 102.

The course covers mathematical concepts relevant to the application of quantitative techniques in business. The basic concepts of finite mathematics, linear programming, and mathematics of finance are the focal points. Many of the topics discussed will involve computer applications.
Prerequisite: Math 120 – College Algebra (Formerly Math 101)


Course Description from the University Catalog:  Course emphasis will be placed on recognition and special needs of students labeled exceptional according to state and federal regulations. Effective instructional strategies for teaching populations such as gifted, and students at risk for school failure, visually impaired, physically challenged, speech/language handicaps and behavior disorders will be studied. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 202 with a “C” or better or concurrent with EDUC 202. 

This course will serve as an overview of leadership theories and their application in the interest of school improvement. This is an introductory course in educational leadership. Focus will be on school and district level leaders and their roles in the learning process within the greater learning community.

This course prepares prospective educational leaders to administer various school programs for diverse student populations. Emphasis will be given to basic concepts, issues, regulations, problems and procedures in the management of special and compensatory education. Also included will be state and federal legislation and court decisions pertaining to special pupil populations and career and technology education.

This field-based practicum will allow candidates to apply knowledge of educational leadership, educational law and policy, change, innovation, professional development, financial and human resource management, and data-based decision making for school and district improvement.

American music in the 20th century is notable in its diversity. Composers, performers and consumers are attracted to many media and many styles. This broad panorama or spectrum includes orchestral music, chamber music, jazz music, rock music, church music and varying types of folk music. The many faces of American Music will be heard, analyzed and
discussed.

3 Credit Hours

An introduction to music for the non-major through historical survey and the development of listening skills. The individuals in the class will expect to understand the basic elements of music in order to develop competence in the aural analysis of music. The development of music will be examined in the light of historical events, and will be integrated with developments in the other arts, literature, and the humanities.