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If you are new to Moodle, take a look at our training course, Online Student Orientation, located in the navigation bar at the top of this screen. If you have questions about how to use Moodle, please stop by Wallace 222, send us an email at col@wvstateu.edu, or call us at 304-766-3300.

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Notice about Financial Aid
As a student, you should check your Financial Aid Requirements, at least once a week, throughout each semester.  As most of you know, there are attendance requirements involved in your financial aid eligibility, as well as academic, that may need verified.  The Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships utilizes your MyState account and your campus email as their primary sources of communication.


About WVSU

Founded in 1891, West Virginia State University is a public, land-grant, historically black university, which has evolved into a fully accessible, racially integrated, and multi-generational institution.

The University, “a living laboratory of human relations,” is a community of students, staff, and faculty committed to academic growth, service, and preservation of the racial and cultural diversity of the institution.

With the goal of improving the quality of our students’ lives, as well as the quality of life for West Virginia’s citizens, the University forges mutually beneficial relationships with other educational institutions, businesses, cultural organizations, governmental agencies, and agricultural and extension partners.


Available courses

This course examines ways to preserve bat populations and habitats in suburban areas

(3 Credit Hours) An introductory course concerned primarily with the functioning of specific parts of the economy. The theory of consumer behavior and firm behavior under varying degrees of competition; the determination of price in both product and resource markets. Application of the theory to current microeconomic problems.

(3 Credit Hours) An overview of personal and family financial planning with an emphasis on financial record-keeping, planning your spending, tax planning, consumer credit, making buying decisions, purchasing insurance, selecting investments, and retirement and estate planning. 

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 and eligibility for MATH 111.


(3 Credit Hours) An introduction to the financial accounting cycle from analyzing economic events to financial statement preparation and use. The course also includes a basic study of accounting for corporate assets, liabilities, and equities, as well as financial statement analysis. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 and MATH 118, 118E or 120.


(3 Credit Hours) The course provides an introduction into the functional disciplines of Business Administration: Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing and Information Systems. The course provides a survey of the disciplines and will assist a student in choosing an are a of concentrated studies leading to a degree in Business Administration. The course will begin to build the skills necessary for a successful career in Business.

(3 Credit Hours) This course will introduce the student to the theories and concepts of economics as related to public administration and public policy analysis. While viewing economic considerations as both a tool of public administration and an input into the public policy making process, this course will examine the importance of scarcity and resource allocation in the public realm, the use of both cost-benefit analysis and statistical tools of economic analysis in assessing the relative value of competing policy proposals, as well as the economics of monopolies, oligopolies and competitive firms in the marketplace.

(3 Credit Hours) The first in a three-course sequence providing students with a foundation in theory and a review of the accounting cycle, including preparing time- valuemoney calculations and financial statements. The course includes an in-depth study of generally accepted accounting principles as they apply to cash, receivables and inventories. Comparisons with International Financial Reporting Standards will be introduced as appropriate. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in BA 216.

The purpose of this course is to explore the many dimensions of new venture creation and growth and to foster innovation and new business formations in independent and corporate settings. We will be concerned with content and process questions as well as with formulation and implementation issues that relate to conceptualizing, developing and managing successful new ventures. Prerequisite(s): BA 301. (3 Credit Hours)

(3 Credit Hours) Study of the tasks involved in the marketing of goods and services by both for-profit and nonprofit enterprises. Provides an overview of marketing mix decision requirements within a framework of contemporary economic, social, technological, competitive and regulatory influences. Prerequisite(s): ECON 202.

(3 Credit Hours) The study of effectively selecting, utilizing, assessing and developing managers as well as the role of the Human Resource Department in administering human resources in a changing and demanding environment. Experience in developing and utilizing behavioral science research methods to assess effectiveness. Prerequisite(s): BA 301.

(3 Credit Hours) The study and application of writing formats, styles, and organizational patterns essential in various professions, with particular emphasis on correspondence, reports, and research is the primary focus of this course. There is also a unit covering the writing of resumes and job application letters as well as suggestions for job hunting and interviewing. Prerequisite: English 102

(3 Credit Hours) An introduction to various statistical measures, including central tendency, variation and skewness. Emphasis is also placed on concepts and functions of probability theory, such as the use of binomial and normal distributions. Students will use computer applications to demonstrate their understanding of various concepts. Prerequisite(s): MATH 118, 118E or 120.

(3 credit hours) Mathematical concepts relevant to the application of quantitative techniques in business. Course covers the basic concepts of finite mathematics and mathematics of finance.

Prerequisite: Math 118, 118E, or 120 – College Algebra (Formerly Math 101)


(3 credit hours) This course embraces the conceptual and practical problems associated with the financial management of the nonfinancial corporation. Topics covered, in brief, are an analysis of fund commitments to current assets, short-term financing, evaluation and choice of capital assets, the principle issues of debt/equity mix, investment policy and divided policy as they influence the market value of corporate claims.

Prerequisite: BA 216 and 209. (Note: BA 216 may be taken concurrently with permission of instructor.)



(3 credit hours) An integrative capstone course focusing on presenting and understanding of the nature, formulation and implementation of strategy as it applies to firms and the environment in which they operate. The emphasis is on integrated organizational activities, encompassing top divisional, functional and operational levels, and including perspectives from marketing, accounting, human resources, leadership, policy, ethics and other functional areas of management. Computer simulations, case analysis, and participation in class will develop students’ skills in critical decision-making, collaborative efforts, and formal oral and written reports.


Prerequisites: Completion of 90 credit hours and all other core courses. Department chair or faculty advisor permission required.

A comprehensive, issues-based examination of the earth’s environment, humanity’s impact on it, and how species respond to environmental changes through evolution. Students will complete a group project on a topic in environmental biology; have a laboratory experience consisting of a series of independent problems in environmental biology; and keep a journal, in addition to mastering standard lecture material. The course will include guest speakers. Local field trips may also be required. Does not count toward a major in Biology. Three lecture hours and two lab hours per week. (4 Credit Hours). 

(3 Credit Hours) The course introduces change management as a framework that has evolved from a focus on process improvement using statistical tools to a comprehensive framework for managing a sustainable business. The course also surveys the analytic tools and techniques which are useful in the design and operation of sustainable systems from supply networks to distribution channels. The material is taught from a managerial perspective, with an emphasis on where and how specific tools can be used to improve the overall performance, reduce the total cost, while increasing the sustainability of the firm’s value chain.

Prerequisite: BA 301 and ENGL 204


 (3 credit hours) Equations and inequalities, functions, systems of equations and inequalities, graphing, rational expressions, radical expressions, and applications of the above.

(3 Credit Hours) This course is intended to be an introduction to the field of project management. It examines project management roles and environments, the project life cycle and various techniques of work planning, process controls and evaluations so as to achieve planned objectives. The role of a project manager throughout the live primary processes of managing projects will also be presented.

(3 Credit Hours) The study of effectively selecting, utilizing, assessing and developing managers as well as the role of the Human Resource Department in administering human resources in a changing and demanding environment. Experience in developing and utilizing behavioral science research methods to assess effectiveness. Prerequisite(s): BA 301.

Principles of Microeconomics (3 credit hours) is an introductory course concerned primarily with the functioning of specific parts of the economy. This course covers the theory of consumer behavior and firm behavior under varying degrees of competition; the determination of price in both product and resource markets; and application of the theory to current microeconomic problems.

(3 credit hours) A state-of-the-art study of the operations function. The main objective is to develop operations management abilities, focusing on strategic, global and service operations.

Prerequisites: BA 209 and BA 301.

(3 Credit Hours) This class will teach a rhetorical approach to information design. Using the rhetorical principles of audience, purpose, and context, the course will analyze the layout of documents and discuss effective layout and design. The course will include discussions of theories and principles of information design, but the course will be mainly activities-based in which students will work on their own projects applying the knowledge acquired through readings and lecture. The course assumes that the student already has a good understanding of computers. It is strongly recommended that students take English 228, Introduction to Desktop Publishing, or the equivalent, prior to enrolling in the course. Prerequisite: English 112 (Technical Writing).



(3 credit hours) An integrative capstone course focusing on presenting and understanding of the nature, formulation and implementation of strategy as it applies to firms and the environment in which they operate. The emphasis is on integrated organizational activities, encompassing top divisional, functional and operational levels, and including perspectives from marketing, accounting, human resources, leadership, policy, ethics and other functional areas of management. Computer simulations, case analysis, and participation in class will develop students’ skills in critical decision-making, collaborative efforts, and formal oral and written reports.


Prerequisites: Completion of 90 credit hours and all other core courses. Department chair or faculty advisor permission required.

(3 Credit Hours) An introduction to the financial accounting cycle from analyzing economic events to financial statement preparation and use. The course also includes a basic study of accounting for corporate assets, liabilities, and equities, as well as financial statement analysis. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 and MATH 118, 118E or 120.

(3 Credit Hours) This introductory level course is designed to promote student interest and curiosity regarding the relationship of America with other countries, the forces that drive them, and what the government can or cannot do to resolve particular issues. An average college student should know the evolving issues of international economic significance and the historical perspective of international business and commercial connections between America and the rest of the world.

(3 credit hours) Mathematical concepts relevant to the application of quantitative techniques in business. Course covers the basic concepts of finite mathematics and mathematics of finance.


Prerequisite: Math 118, 118E, or 120 – College Algebra (Formerly Math 101)


(3 Credit Hours) This course is an introduction to the management functions performed in business organizations. It focuses on the theory and fundamental concepts of management including planning, organization, leadership and control. An in-depth review of the evolution of management thought, purpose and practice will be undertaken in the context of current market approaches and emerging theoretical concepts. Prerequisite(s): BA 115 and ENGL 102.

(3 Credit Hours) A combined lecture and studio course in which specific works from the past and present will be studied, analyzed and used as motivation for projects and discussion.

(3 Credit Hours) The first in a three-course sequence providing students with a foundation in theory and a review of the accounting cycle, including preparing time- valuemoney calculations and financial statements. The course includes an in-depth study of generally accepted accounting principles as they apply to cash, receivables and inventories. Comparisons with International Financial Reporting Standards will be introduced as appropriate. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in BA 216.

A comprehensive, issues-based examination of the earth’s environment, humanity’s impact on it, and how species respond to environmental changes through evolution. Students will complete a group project on a topic in environmental biology; have a laboratory experience consisting of a series of independent problems in environmental biology; and keep a journal, in addition to mastering standard lecture material. The course will include guest speakers. Local field trips may also be required. Does not count toward a major in Biology. Three lecture hours and two lab hours per week. (4 Credit Hours). 

(3 Credit Hours) An introductory course concerned with the working of the economy as a whole. Development of the theories of consumption, investment and equilibrium income; application of the theory to current macroeconomic problems; monetary and fiscal policy and its influence on economic activity.



(3 Credit Hours) An introduction to music for the non-major through historical survey and the development of listening skills. The individuals in the class will be expected to understand the basic elements of music in order to develop competence in the aural analysis of music. The development of music will be examined in the light of historical events, and will be integrated with developments in the other arts, literature and the humanities.


(3 Credit Hours) A study of cost and managerial accounting procedures and concepts as applied to service and manufacturing enterprises. Prerequisite(s): BA 216.

(3 Credit Hours) Environmental chemistry is the study and appreciation of the phenomena in the environment. In this course we look at various environmental issues from the viewpoint of the chemist and look at the political implications as well. The study of various environmental factors and pollutants in our water, soil and air and their effects on the planet. Includes laboratory work.

(3 Credit Hours) A survey of managerial accounting and decision making. The economic ideas underlying managerial planning and decisions, accounting for the various manufacturing environments, basic budgeting, short-term decision making, and capital allocation represent the managerial accounting topics covered. Cash flow analysis and the use of financial ratios in financial statement analysis will also be covered.

(3 Credit Hours) An introduction to various statistical measures, including central tendency, variation and skewness. Emphasis is also placed on concepts and functions of probability theory, such as the use of binomial and normal distributions. Students will use computer applications to demonstrate their understanding of various concepts. Prerequisite(s): MATH 118, 118E or 120.

(3 Credit Hours) Introduction, definitions, social forces, classifications and sources of civil law. Fundamental principles of commercial law which relate to common business transactions and occurrences based upon contractual agreements. Theoretical and practical emphasis on the rights, duties, powers and privileges incident to oral and written contracts. Analysis of the essential elements of a valid and enforceable contract. Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENGL 101. (This course fulfills the General Education requirement in American Traditions)

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BA 363

This 3-credit hour course is the second in a three-course sequence designed to provide the student with a foundation in the theoretical concepts underlying the preparation of financial statements. The course includes an in-depth study of generally accepted accounting principles as they apply to selected technical areas. Comparisons with International Financial Reporting Standards will be introduced as appropriate.


A comprehensive, issues-based examination of the earth’s environment, humanity’s impact on it, and how species respond to environmental changes through evolution. Students will complete a group project on a topic in environmental biology; have a laboratory experience consisting of a series of independent problems in environmental biology; and keep a journal, in addition to mastering standard lecture material. The course will include guest speakers. Local field trips may also be required. Does not count toward a major in Biology. Three lecture hours and two lab hours per week. (4 Credit Hours). 

(3 credit hours) This course embraces the conceptual and practical problems associated with the financial management of the nonfinancial corporation. Topics covered, in brief, are an analysis of fund commitments to current assets, short-term financing, evaluation and choice of capital assets, the principle issues of debt/equity mix, investment policy and divided policy as they influence the market value of corporate claims.

Prerequisite: BA 216 and 209. (Note: BA 216 may be taken concurrently with permission of instructor.)


(3 Credit Hours) A combined lecture and studio course in which specific works from the past and present will be studied, analyzed and used as motivation for projects and discussion.

(3 Credit Hours) The study and application of writing formats, styles, and organizational patterns essential in various professions, with particular emphasis on correspondence, reports, and research is the primary focus of this course. There is also a unit covering the writing of resumes and job application letters as well as suggestions for job hunting and interviewing. Prerequisite: English 102

(3 Credit Hours) This course helps students improve their writing by reviewing the rules of grammar, usage, and mechanics. Systematic attention is given to sentence construction, punctuation, spelling, vocabulary development, and self-help through effective use of the dictionary. Emphasis will be placed on the use of such skills in practical, everyday communication. (English 160 cannot be substituted for English 101 or 102.)

(3 Credit Hours) This class is a continuation of Information Design I. Applying the theories and principles of information design learned in Information Design I, students will work on a client-directed project. Student will also learn about theories and principles of website design and practice creating and managing websites. Prerequisite: English 412 (Information Design I).

(3 Credit Hours) An introductory course concerned with the working of the economy as a whole. Development of the theories of consumption, investment and equilibrium income; application of the theory to current macroeconomic problems; monetary and fiscal policy and its influence on economic activity.

(3 Credit Hours) Study of the tasks involved in the marketing of goods and services by both for-profit and nonprofit enterprises. Provides an overview of marketing mix decision requirements within a framework of contemporary economic, social, technological, competitive and regulatory influences. Prerequisite(s): ECON 202.

(3 Credit Hours) This course primarily focuses on the research writing process for a broad academic community. It covers basic research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and non-electronic sources and techniques of formal writing. Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking skills. Prerequisite(s): ENGL101. Must be completed within the first 60 hours of college credit.

(3 Credit Hours) An examination of ethical issues in business. Interrelationships of ethics with religions, governments, both domestic and foreign, and the law will be covered. All major business disciplines will be covered. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 102.



(3 Credit Hours) Environmental chemistry is the study and appreciation of the phenomena in the environment. In this course we look at various environmental issues from the viewpoint of the chemist and look at the political implications as well. The study of various environmental factors and pollutants in our water, soil and air and their effects on the planet. Includes laboratory work.

(3 Credit Hours) The purpose of this course is to explore the many dimensions of new venture creation and growth and to foster innovation and new business formations in independent and corporate settings. We will be concerned with content and process questions as well as with formulation and implementation issues that relate to conceptualizing, developing and managing successful new ventures. 

Prerequisite(s): BA 301.

This 3 Credit Hours course provides an introduction into the functional disciplines of Business Administration: Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing and Information Systems. The course provides a survey of the disciplines and will assist a student in choosing an area of concentration studies leading to a degree in Business Administration. The course will begin to build the skills necessary for a successful career in Business.

(3 Credit Hours) This course will examine the multifaceted problem of crime victimization. It focuses on the incidence of criminal victimization, social characteristics of crime victims, and the treatment of the victim by the Criminal Justice System. It also examines the efforts designed to alleviate the consequences of criminal victimization and provide support for the victim. This course is 100% online using the learning management system (LMS) available by clicking the WVSU online option on the main webpage www.wvstateu.edu. All course material will be available to students online.

(3 Credit Hours) An introductory course concerned with the working of the economy as a whole. Development of the theories of consumption, investment and equilibrium income; application of the theory to current macroeconomic problems; monetary and fiscal policy and its influence on economic activity.

(3 Credit Hours) This course aims to prepare students comprehensively for editing tasks in technical and other professional environments by engaging students in various technical tasks including copy editing, compilation, document design and reorganization, and management and production of client projects. The course will cover methods for working in both a paper and in an electronic environment. This course assumes that the student has the foundations of technical or report writing, as taught in English 112, Technical Writing, and English 204, Writing for Business and Other Professions. Prerequisite: English 112 or English 204 or permission of the instructor.

 (3 credit hours) Equations and inequalities, functions, systems of equations and inequalities, graphing, rational expressions, radical expressions, and applications of the above.

This course examines ways to preserve bat populations and habitats in suburban areas

(3 credit hours) A course designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of how a free-market economy works as individuals make microeconomic decisions of their own based on cost-benefit principle. Discussions of the cyclical nature of GDP production, joblessness, cost of living, interest rates, public debt and deficits will be included.

This course is a study of the basic rules of elements and their compounds. This allows you to develop an appreciation of the beauty of consumer chemistry. The course will involve a close look into the food we eat, the fuel we burn, and the products we use as health and beauty aids.

This course is an introduction to the development of an appreciation of art. Special emphasis is placed on methods, techniques, and terminology that relate to art as well as artists, cultures, and art movements throughout history.

Thomas Kiddie
Try new things in this course. There's no way to mess it up. 

(3 Credit Hours) This course primarily focuses on the research writing process for a broad academic community. It covers basic research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and non-electronic sources and techniques of formal writing. Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking skills. Prerequisite(s): ENGL101. Must be completed within the first 60 hours of college credit.

Eng. 360 (3 credit hours) This course will examine a single literary author and her or his major works.  After situating the specific author in her or his literary period, the class will read a range of literature written by the specified author.  (In some cases, the study of an author may be supplemented by reading other closely related authors.)  Intensive study of a single author will allow the students to study historical, cultural, and literary influences and to use that information to enjoy and analyze a single author’s body of work and impact on readers and writers. 

(3 Credit Hours) A combined lecture and studio course in which specific works from the past and present will be studied, analyzed and used as motivation for projects and discussion.

A study of poetry, fiction and drama. The course stresses basic themes and formal elements found in literature. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 placement.

(3 Credit Hours) An introduction to music for the non-major through historical survey and the development of listening skills. The individuals in the class will be expected to understand the basic elements of music in order to develop competence in the aural analysis of music. The development of music will be examined in the light of historical events, and will be integrated with developments in the other arts, literature and the humanities.

A general survey of principles, theories and fields of psychology with emphasis on application. (Course is designed for the student who wishes to gain a greater understanding of human behavior, both adaptive and nonadaptive.) Prerequisite(s): eligibility for ENGL 101.

(3 credit hours) A course designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of how a free-market economy works as individuals make microeconomic decisions of their own based on cost-benefit principle. Discussions of the cyclical nature of GDP production, joblessness, cost of living, interest rates, public debt and deficits will be included.

(3 Credit Hours) Problem solving, number systems, logic, consumer math, basic algebra and geometry, basic probability and statistics. Prerequisite(s): In addition, students must fulfill the associated lab component requirements.

(3 Credit Hours) This course is a study of the basic rules of elements and their compounds. This allows you to develop an appreciation of the beauty of consumer chemistry. The course will involve a close look at the food we eat, the fuel we burn, and the products we use as health and beauty aids.

This course primarily focuses on the research writing process for a broad academic community. It covers basic research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and non-electronic sources and techniques of formal writing. Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking skills. Prerequisite(s): ENGL101. Must be completed within the first 60 hours of college credit.

(3 credit hours) An introduction to the federal taxation of individuals. This course is designed to introduce students to personal income tax procedures. A conceptual approach is emphasized. Specific topics will include but are not limited to: basic tax models, tax laws, tax computation, gross income, deductions, depreciation and ethics

(3 Credit Hours) Introduction, definitions, social forces, classifications and sources of civil law. Fundamental principles of commercial law which relate to common business transactions and occurrences based upon contractual agreements. Theoretical and practical emphasis on the rights, duties, powers and privileges incident to oral and written contracts. Analysis of the essential elements of a valid and enforceable contract. Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENGL 101. (This course fulfills the General Education requirement in American Traditions)

(3 Credit Hours) This course is a study of the basic rules of elements and their compounds. This allows you to develop an appreciation of the beauty of consumer chemistry. The course will involve a close look at the food we eat, the fuel we burn, and the products we use as health and beauty aids.

(3 Credit Hours) Analysis of taxation and government expenditures. The impact of various levels of government on the local, state and national economies. Historical and current analysis of the role of fiscal policy on business cycles. Prerequisite(s): ECON 201 and 202.

(3 Credit Hours) An examination of the major theories, research and methods of lifespan developmental psychology. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 151. (Formerly PSYC 411)

(3 Credit Hours) The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the behavior of employees at the individual, group and organizational levels. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of application and theory. Topics to be covered include: motivation, team building, perception, attitudes, communication, conflict, stress and leadership.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 102; Grade of C or better in BA 301.


(3 credit hours) This course recognizes the importance of understanding the dynamics of diversity in modern organizations around the world in terms of clientele, human resource and ownership. To equip managers for the challenges of global demands emphasis is on strategic, socio-cultural, behavioral, legal-political, ethical issues as well as on the functional aspects of international management.
Prerequisite: BA 310.