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If you are new to Moodle, take a look at our training course--Online Student Orientation: A Virtual Walk to Class--located in the navigation bar at the top of this screen. If you have questions about how to use Moodle, please stop by Wallace 222, send us an email at col@wvstateu.edu, or call us at 304-766-3300.

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About WVSU

Founded in 1891, West Virginia State University is a public, land-grant, historically black university, which has evolved into a fully accessible, racially integrated, and multi-generational institution.

The University, “a living laboratory of human relations,” is a community of students, staff, and faculty committed to academic growth, service, and preservation of the racial and cultural diversity of the institution.

With the goal of improving the quality of our students’ lives, as well as the quality of life for West Virginia’s citizens, the University forges mutually beneficial relationships with other educational institutions, businesses, cultural organizations, governmental agencies, and agricultural and extension partners.


Available courses

This course examines ways to preserve bat populations and habitats in suburban areas

(3 credit hours) An introduction to research methods in educational settings. This course will allow students to determine how data can be used to make instructional decisions at the classroom, building, and district level.

This course will serve as an exploration of historical and current issues related to educational leadership, with an emphasis on legal and ethical issues including social justice, human rights, fairness, and equity. Students apply principles of leadership, ethics, and critical thinking while examining approaches to conceptualizing, interpreting, and making operational social justice.

3 Credit Hour Course – This course will provide a detailed look into Needs and Capacity Assessment Strategies for Health Education and Health Promotion.

(1 Credit Hour) A course designed to prepare adult learners for the transition back into academic study. In addition to strengthening career and life goal development, students will acquire management skills, appreciate support systems, and develop a plan of study. This course addresses specific issues and theories related to adult learners.

Analysis of the environment and the managerial functions of recruiting, employee assessments and development, retention, and employee relations with the enterprise, with emphasis on the relationships among people, on group interactions, on relations, and on relations between employers and employees.

(3 credit hours) This is a practical course in action research. Students will conduct an action research project based on an identified need in a public school setting and present it to their peers.

Analysis of the environment and the managerial functions of recruiting, employee assessments and development, retention, and employee relations with the enterprise, with emphasis on the relationships among people, on group interactions, onrelations, and on relations between employers and employees.
An introduction to the financial accounting cycle from analyzing economic events to financial statement preparation and use. The course also includes a basic study of the accounting for corporate assets, liabilities, and equities, as well as financial statement analyses.

This is a lecture/discussion/creating course that surveys objects of art in the student’s environment and proceeds from the comfortable and familiar to the international. The course uses lecture, discussion, and student participation to introduce the basic concepts of Art and Art History.

This 3 Credit Hours course provides an introduction into the functional disciplines of Business Administration: Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing and Information Systems. The course provides a survey of the disciplines and will assist a student in choosing an area of concentration studies leading to a degree in Business Administration. The course will begin to build the skills necessary for a successful career in Business.

The course covers mathematical concepts relevant to the application of quantitative techniques in business. The basic concepts of finite mathematics, linear programming, and mathematics of finance are the focal points. Many of the topics discussed will involve computer applications.
Prerequisite: Math 120 – College Algebra (Formerly Math 101)

Introduction, definitions, social forces, classifications and sources of civil law. Fundamental principles of commercial law which relate to common business transactions and occurrences based upon contractual agreements. Theoretical and practical emphasis on the rights, duties, powers and privileges incident to oral and written contracts. Analysis of the essential elements of a valid and enforceable contract. Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENGL 101. (This course fulfills the General Education requirement in American Traditions)

An introduction to the financial accounting cycle from analyzing economic events to financial statement preparation and use. The course also includes a basic study of the accounting for corporate assets, liabilities, and equities, as well as financial statement analyses.

To introduce students to the basic concepts in the organization and management of institutions. Emphasis is placed on managing in a contemporary context including planning, organizing, leading, and controlling while adjusting to change and maintaining effective performance.

Analysis of the environment and the managerial functions of recruiting, employee assessments and development, retention, and employee relations with the enterprise, with emphasis on the relationships among people, on group interactions, onrelations, and on relations between employers and employees.

(3 credit hours) An introduction to the federal taxation of individuals. This course is designed to introduce students to personal income tax procedures. A conceptual approach is emphasized. Specific topics will include but are not limited to: basic tax models, tax laws, tax computation, gross income, deductions, depreciation and ethics

(3 credit hours) The first in a three-course sequence providing students with a foundation in theory and a review of the accounting cycle, including preparing time-value money calculations and financial statements. The course includes an in-depth study of generally accepted accounting principles as they apply to cash, receivables and inventories. Comparisons with International Financial Reporting Standards will be introduced as appropriate.

Prerequisite: BA 216 with a grade of C or better.


An integrative capstone course focusing on presenting and understanding of the nature, formulation and implementation of strategy as it applies to firms and the environment in which they operate. The emphasis is on integrated organizational activities, encompassing top divisional, functional and operational levels, and including perspectives from marketing, accounting, human resources, leadership, policy, ethics and other functional areas of management. Computer simulations, case analysis, and participation in class will develop students’ skills in critical decision-making, collaborative efforts, and formal oral and written reports.

(3 credit hours) A state-of-the-art study of the operations function. The main objective is to develop operations management abilities, focusing on strategic, global and service operations.
Prerequisites: BA 209 and BA 301.



This course recognizes the importance of understanding the dynamics of diversity in modern organizations around the world in terms of clientele, human resource and ownership. To equip managers for the challenges of global demands emphasis is on strategic, socio-cultural, behavioral, legal-political, ethical issues as well as on the functional aspects of international management.

The course introduces change management as a framework that has evolved from a focus on process improvement using statistical tools to a comprehensive framework for managing a sustainable business. The course also surveys the analytic tools and techniques which are useful in the design and operation of sustainable systems from supply networks to distribution channels. The material is taught from a managerial perspective, with an emphasis on where and how specific tools can be used to improve the overall performance, reduce the total cost, while increasing the sustainability of the firm’s value chain.

Prerequisite: BA 301 and ENGL 204


A comprehensive, issues-based examination of the earth’s environment, humanity’s impact on it. Students will complete group discussions on various topics in environmental biology, and a laboratory experience consisting of a series of independent problems in environmental biology, in addition to mastering the standard lecture material. Does not count toward a major in Biology. This course will teach some theories and the supporting evidence related to them concerning the following biological topics:

The fundamental nature of life
The chemical and physical nature of living systems
The flow of energy through living systems
The dynamic nature of the environment
The organization of living systems in the natural world and their interrelations with each other and the environment
Human relationships to the natural world
These topics do not comprise the whole of environmental science. The field is very broad and deep and cannot be covered in a single course. The selection of these topics represents a compromise intended to develop a background of insight and understanding which will prepare you to confront some of the important environmental issues of our time.

This course is a survey of the history, organization, and function of the various components of the criminal justice system, which includes law enforcement, the courts, and corrections. The course includes an analysis of the decisions made in the justice process whereby citizens become suspects, suspects become defendants, and some defendants are convicted in turn becoming probationers, inmates, and parolees.

A study of the law of juvenile delinquency and the administration of the juvenile justice system. Examines the historical development of the concept of delinquency, and the special status of juveniles before the law. Surveys the major theories of delinquency. Considers the legal processing of abuse, neglect and dependency cases.

(3 Credit Hours) This course will examine the multifaceted problem of crime victimization. It focuses on the incidence of criminal victimization, social characteristics of crime victims, and the treatment of the victim by the Criminal Justice System. It also examines the efforts designed to alleviate the consequences of criminal victimization and provide support for the victim. This course is 100% online using the learning management system (LMS) available by clicking the WVSU online option on the main webpage www.wvstateu.edu. All course material will be available to students online.

(3 credit hours) This course offers an examination of the ethical quandaries and moral dilemmas that face criminal justice practitioners; a critical review of the ethical standards used to define appropriate conduct by criminal justice officials; and explores sanctions and laws governing inappropriate conduct.

This course is to explore ethical dilemmas in the criminal justice field and discipline. Students will explore how law, policy, and procedures, as well as social and historical factors, are driven by ethical expectations and practices. The course content is grounded in philosophical thought, but students learn various ways of understanding and acting in ethical manners as they enter into the criminal justice field as practitioners or academics.


This course is designed to cover the issues related to the development of appropriate professional research techniques, document development, written and oral communications in in law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Students will concentrate on the development of proper research skills involving professional and peer reviewed resources in various formats. The student will engage in a variety of criminal justice writing formats, including policy analysis, regulation creation, legislation development, and case studies. They will refine their utilization of a criminal justice style sheet.

This course focuses on the theories of crime. These theories come from several fields, including biology, criminal justice, psychology, and sociology. The theories will be examined from a historical perspective beginning with the Classical School in the 1700’s and progressing to the newest integrated theories. The types and extent of crime in the United States and other countries will also be explored. This course provides an introduction to the field of criminology, providing an overview of the issues involved in defining, measuring, and explaining crime. Students will learn about the field of criminology, examine general characteristics of crime and criminals, review early and contemporary theories which attempt to explain criminal behavior, and discuss crime in the modern world.

(Three Credit Hours) This course will focus on jails and prisons. Students will be provided with information on the history of incarceration, as well as theories behind this type of punishment. The course will cover the current conditions of prison life and will provide students with the viewpoints of those who live and work in prisons and jails. Also, management of prisons and jails will be discussed.

This course is designed as a capstone experience for all seniors in the criminal justice major. The course content will vary slightly with each offering. The course will basically cover in-depth analyses of problems and issues in the criminal justice system. The course also will provide students with information about opportunities for employment in the criminal justice field and graduate school. The course will use up-to-date texts and articles from professional journals. Students will be required to complete a major research paper on a topic chosen by the student and approved by the instructor. Successful completion of the course with a grade of C or better is required for graduation. Prerequisite(s): CJ 101, 204, 223, 224, 225, 226, 307, 308, 313, 315, 322, 380 and senior standing.

This course combines economic theory with geography to address critical problems of growth, distribution, and development, along with their impact on international business. It introduces the student to the global economy in an era of shifting borders, restructuring economies, and regional realignments. Recent geopolitical changes are vividly portrayed in a series of superb full-color maps and striking photographs.

This course explores standard and emergent technologies related to effective instruction and administrative operations within a school. Reliable and effective web-based communication and modalities of e-learning are examined, including the development of a school technology plan. This course will provide students with both the theoretical and the practical considerations for planning and implementing technology in public education settings. This course is designed so that students will gain an understanding of the role of the principal in moving beyond short-term thinking and helping schools move forward with technology

(3 credit hours) This course focuses on applying information on school needs as well as knowledge of local, state, and national policy to effective management practices. Students will learn how to legally and effectively manage school operations, including management of financial and human resources and how to schedule for the effective use of time and physical resources. This is an intense eight-week program that will allow you to learn what policies, procedures and technologies are in place for you to develop the proper allocation of resources.

This course emphasizes writing and reading as elements of active learning and critical thinking. ENGL 101E is required for students with an ACT score of 17 or below (or SAT equivalent score of 470 or below), but can be taken by students who achieve scores above this mark. Those who are not eligible for regular English 101 section must fulfill required Writing Center hours while enrolled in this course. Prerequisite(s): Must be completed within the first 60 hours of college credit.

(3 credit hours) This course primarily focuses on the research writing process for a broad academic community. It covers basic research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and nonelectronic sources and techniques of formal writing. Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking skills.

A study of poetry, fiction and drama. The course stresses basic themes and formal elements found in literature. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 placement.

This course will focus on the basic principles of effective document design and the tools for desktop publishing (DTP). The course will cover the basics of layout and design and how those principles are applied to various types of documents as well as integrating rhetorical concepts, particularly genres and modes of delivery, with the modern technology of desktop publishing.

Prerequisite: Art 101 and Eng. 102 or 112 with a final grade of “C” or higher.


(3 Credit Hours) This class will teach a rhetorical approach to information design. Using the rhetorical principles of audience, purpose, and context, the course will analyze the layout of documents and discuss effective layout and design. The course will include discussions of theories and principles of information design, but the course will be mainly activities-based in which students will work on their own projects applying the knowledge acquired through readings and lecture. The course assumes that the student already has a good understanding of computers. It is strongly recommended that students take English 228, Introduction to Desktop Publishing, or the equivalent, prior to enrolling in the course. Prerequisite: English 112 (Technical Writing).plus Senior status (90 credit hours).



(3 Credit Hours) An introductory study of the discipline of health sciences, sports studies, health and physical education and the many factors that influence our health such as heredity, environment, health care services, and our own behavior. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of health education and health promotion to other disciplines, concepts of learning and behavior change, comprehensive school health programs, models and theories of human development and behavior with application to health education, competencies and skills of health educators, ethics, and current and future issues in health education. Students will also use the Internet to explore the various resources available to and community health education/promotion specialists.

Designed to inform, interest and motivate students toward good health as it relates to effective, productive and satisfying living. We will look at health as a dynamic, ever-changing process of trying to achieve individual potential in the physical, mental, social, emotional, spiritual and environmental dimensions. 2 Credit Hours

This course examines the metabolic requirements needed for a variety of physical activity, as well as the impact that physical activity, training and scientifically directed nutrition can have on one’s body composition and human performance.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 210 and HHP 327 (HHP 327 and 340 can be taken concurrently).


This course is designed to be an introductory experience for the research consumer as well as the research producer in the health sciences. This course emphasizes developing conceptual understanding of using the scientific method as a means of problem solving, both as a critical consumer and as an entry-level researcher.

3 Credit Hour Course – An examination of the broad and challenging profession of community health education with an emphasis on communities and their health status. The course will also address the social/political reasons why many community health problems continue to exist.

3 Credit Hour Course – This course examines social issues and challenges in rural health with emphasis on morbidity and mortality status among rural populations, health disparities, health hazards, health care, environmental health and food insecurity. Prerequisite(s): HHP 354.

 (3 credit hours) Equations and inequalities, functions, systems of equations and inequalities, graphing, rational expressions, radical expressions, and applications of the above.

A detailed approach to portfolio development for the Regents Bachelor of Arts degree through the assessment of work and life experience. Students will learn to select, categorize and document various forms of personal and professional achievement and experiences. The course is required for anyone interested in pursuing the portfolio option in a specified academic content area.

(1 Credit Hour) A course designed to prepare adult learners for the transition back into academic study. In addition to strengthening career and life goal development, students will acquire management skills, appreciate support systems, and develop a plan of study. This course addresses specific issues and theories related to adult learners.

This 3 Credit Hours course explores the many dimensions of new venture creation and growth and to foster innovation and new business formations in independent and corporate settings. We will be concerned with content and process questions as well as with formulation and implementation issues that relate to conceptualizing, developing and managing successful new ventures

This 3 Credit Hours course provides an introduction into the functional disciplines of Business Administration: Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing and Information Systems. The course provides a survey of the disciplines and will assist a student in choosing an area of concentration studies leading to a degree in Business Administration. The course will begin to build the skills necessary for a successful career in Business.

(3 Credit Hours) This course will examine the multifaceted problem of crime victimization. It focuses on the incidence of criminal victimization, social characteristics of crime victims, and the treatment of the victim by the Criminal Justice System. It also examines the efforts designed to alleviate the consequences of criminal victimization and provide support for the victim. This course is 100% online using the learning management system (LMS) available by clicking the WVSU online option on the main webpage www.wvstateu.edu. All course material will be available to students online.

Principles of macroeconomics is a course designed to introduce students to basic principles of economic theory and policy. It presents economics as a systematic discipline that deals with the production and distribution of goods and services in a world with unlimited human aspirations but finite productive resources. The basic methods of thoughts and tools of analysis used by economists will be discussed. The student will be introduced to the important policy issues that make economics a lively and controversial field. This course has no prerequisites.

This course aims to prepare students comprehensively for editing tasks in technical and other professional environments by engaging students in various technical tasks including copy editing, compilation, document design and reorganization, and management and production of client projects. The course will cover methods for working in both a paper and in an electronic environment. This course assumes that the student has the foundations of technical or report writing, as taught in English 112, Technical Writing, and English 204, Writing for Business and Other Professions. Prerequisite: English 112 or English 204 or permission of the instructor.

(3 Credit Hours)  This is a lecture/discussion/creating course that surveys objects of art in the student’s environment and proceeds from the comfortable and familiar to the international. The course uses lecture, discussion, and student participation to introduce the basic concepts of Art and Art History.

 (3 credit hours) Equations and inequalities, functions, systems of equations and inequalities, graphing, rational expressions, radical expressions, and applications of the above.

This course examines ways to preserve bat populations and habitats in suburban areas

(3 credit hours) A course designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of how a free-market economy works as individuals make microeconomic decisions of their own based on cost-benefit principle. Discussions of the cyclical nature of GDP production, joblessness, cost of living, interest rates, public debt and deficits will be included.

This course is a study of the basic rules of elements and their compounds. This allows you to develop an appreciation of the beauty of consumer chemistry. The course will involve a close look into the food we eat, the fuel we burn, and the products we use as health and beauty aids.

This course is an introduction to the development of an appreciation of art. Special emphasis is placed on methods, techniques, and terminology that relate to art as well as artists, cultures, and art movements throughout history.

Thomas Kiddie
Try new things in this course. There's no way to mess it up. 

This course focuses on using National, State, District and School data to improve teaching and learning, including improving the achievement of identified low-achieving groups.

Pre-requisites: Approved entry into the West Virginia State University’s Master’s in Instruction Educational leadership program.

(3 credit hours) This course explores change theory and its application to the school setting. Candidates will identify and explore emerging trends and issues in the change process with emphasis on sustaining innovation through reculturing and ongoing professional learning and development.

Prerequisites: Approved entry into the West Virginia State University’s Master’s in Instruction Educational leadership program.

(3 credit hours) This course explores change theory and its application to the school setting. Candidates will identify and explore emerging trends and issues in the change process with emphasis on sustaining innovation through reculturing and ongoing professional learning and development.

Prerequisites: Approved entry into the West Virginia State University’s Master’s in Instruction Educational leadership program.

This course focuses on applying information on school needs as well as knowledge of local, state, and national policy to effective management practices. Students will learn how to legally and effectively manage school operations, including management of financial and human resources and how to schedule for the effective use of time and physical resources. This is an intense eight-week program that will allow you to learn what policies, procedures and technologies are in place for you to develop the proper allocation of resources.

This course emphasizes writing and reading as elements of active learning and critical thinking. Prerequisite(s): ACT English score of 18 or above (or SAT equivalent score) or a grade of C in a developmental writing course. Must be completed within the first 60 hours of college credit.

(4 Credit Hours) Vectors, lines and planes in space, quadric surfaces, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, vector calculus, multivariable functions, partial differentiation and gradients, constrained and unconstrained optimization, double and triple integrals, volume, centroids, moments of inertia, line integrals. Prerequisite(s): MATH 207.

(3 Credit Hours) An entry-level graduate course designed to familiarize students with the basic tools and techniques to do acceptable graduate work.  Emphasis will be given to critical methods of research, study, and writing.  


(3 Credit Hours) A supervised field experience where candidates become involved with selected exceptionalities studied in the survey course. Limited and guided participation is expected and participants will meet periodically in seminar. Requires 60 clock hours of field experiences in special settings. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 227 co-requisite or completion of EDUC 227 with a “C” or better.

 (3 credit hours) Equations and inequalities, functions, systems of equations and inequalities, graphing, rational expressions, radical expressions, and applications of the above.

This course surveys the major achievements of human history from its origins to around 1715, centered on the links and interactions between civilizations which have transformed the world. Particular attention is given to the social, political and cultural developments of these societies, how they have persisted or changed over time, and how their cultures have shaped human behavior and human relations in different civilizations. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101.

This course is designed as an introductory class in the study of geography, with emphasis on physical and cultural aspects. A major focus will be toward learning and applying geographic concepts to regional and systematic methods.

(3 Credit Hours) A study of the knowledge and skills needed for the development of effective helping relationships. Students will examine their own values as they learn interviewing and other intervention techniques used in social work practice. Prerequisite(s): admission to social work program, S WK 202 and 245, or permission of instructor.

(3 Credit Hours). An introduction to the basic technical and aesthetic elements of the art of film. The class will examine the nature of cinema and its relation to our culture and our lives through analysis of its many components. 

(3 credit hours) This course will introduce the student to the study of serial killers including the history and types of serial killers. The methodology of the investigative process involving profiling of serial killers as well as the many aspects of these types of homicide/murder investigations will be covered. To further enhance the student’s understanding of homicide/murder, this course will incorporate interdisciplinary knowledge from the fields of criminology, sociology, history, psychology and political science. (No prerequisites)

(3 Credit Hours) Teacher candidates will explore important mathematical ideas and their development with a focus on the essentials of instruction in the elementary and middle school and an emphasis on national and state standards. Specific emphasis is placed on developmentally appropriate materials and methods to be used in the teaching of mathematics. Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory completion of EDUC 316, MATH 104 and MATH 105 with a grade of “C” or better.