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Welcome!

If you are new to Moodle, take a look at our training course--Online Student Orientation: A Virtual Walk to Class--located in the navigation bar at the top of this screen. If you have questions about how to use Moodle, please stop by Wallace 222, send us an email at col@wvstateu.edu, or call us at 304-766-3300.

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About WVSU

Founded in 1891, West Virginia State University is a public, land-grant, historically black university, which has evolved into a fully accessible, racially integrated, and multi-generational institution.

The University, “a living laboratory of human relations,” is a community of students, staff, and faculty committed to academic growth, service, and preservation of the racial and cultural diversity of the institution.

With the goal of improving the quality of our students’ lives, as well as the quality of life for West Virginia’s citizens, the University forges mutually beneficial relationships with other educational institutions, businesses, cultural organizations, governmental agencies, and agricultural and extension partners.


Available courses

BA 203. Business Statistics An introduction to various statistical measures, including central tendency, variation and skewness. Emphasis is also placed on concepts and functions of probability theory, such as the use of binomial and normal distributions. Students will use computer applications to demonstrate their understanding of various concepts. Prerequisite(s): MATH 120.

Introduction, definitions, social forces, classifications and sources of civil law. Fundamental principles of commercial law which relate to common business transactions and occurrences based upon contractual agreements. Theoretical and practical emphasis on the rights, duties, powers and privileges incident to oral and written contracts. Analysis of the essential elements of a valid and enforceable contract. Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENGL 101. (This course fulfills the General Education requirement in American Traditions)

Analysis of the environment and the managerial functions of recruiting, employee assessments and development, retention, and employee relations with the enterprise, with emphasis on the relationships among people, on group interactions, on relations, and on relations between employers and employees.

Prerequisite: BA 216 with a grade of C or better.

(3 credit hours) An introduction to the federal taxation of individuals. This course is designed to introduce students to personal income tax procedures. A conceptual approach is emphasized. Specific topics will include but are not limited to: basic tax models, tax laws, tax computation, gross income, deductions, depreciation and ethics.

(3 Credit Hours) The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the behavior of employees at the individual, group and organizational levels. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of application and theory. Topics to be covered include: motivation, team building, perception, attitudes, communication, conflict, stress and leadership.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 102; Grade of C or better in BA 301.

This course is intended to be an introduction to the field of project management. It examines project management roles and environments, the project life cycle and various techniques of work planning, process controls and evaluations so as to achieve planned objectives. The role of a project manager throughout the live primary processes of managing projects will also be presented.

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BA 363

This 3-credit hour course is the second in a three-course sequence designed to provide the student with a foundation in the theoretical concepts underlying the preparation of financial statements. The course includes an in-depth study of generally accepted accounting principles as they apply to selected technical areas. Comparisons with International Financial Reporting Standards will be introduced as appropriate.

(Credit hours: 4) A comprehensive, issues based examination of the Earth’s environment, and humanity’s impact on it. Students will complete group discussions on various topics in environmental biology, and a laboratory experience consisting of a series of independent problems in environmental biology, in addition to mastering the standard lecture material. Does not count toward a major in Biology.

Environmental chemistry is the study and appreciation of the phenomena in the environment. In this course we look at various environmental issues from the viewpoint of the chemist and look at the political implications as well. The study of various environmental factors and pollutants in our water, soil and air and their effects on the planet. Includes laboratory work.

(3 Credit Hours) A study of the law of juvenile delinquency and the administration of the juvenile justice system. Examines the historical development of the concept of delinquency, and the special status of juveniles before the law. Surveys the major theories of delinquency. Considers the legal processing of abuse, neglect and dependency cases.

(3 Credit Hours) This course will examine the multifaceted problem of crime victimization. It focuses on the incidence of criminal victimization, social characteristics of crime victims, and the treatment of the victim by the Criminal Justice System. It also examines the efforts designed to alleviate the consequences of criminal victimization and provide support for the victim. This course is 100% online using the learning management system (LMS) available by clicking the WVSU online option on the main webpage www.wvstateu.edu. All course material will be available to students online.

This course will provide students with a working knowledge of the major structures and basic legal concepts that underlie the Criminal Courts. The structure of the courts, the nature of the criminal law they apply, and the procedures followed by them will be examined along with the history of how they developed, and the goals they seek to achieve. The state and federal court systems will be examined. Prerequisite: CJ 101.

3 Credit Hours The study of the dynamics of racial prejudice in the United States and how it affects the criminal justice system. The relationship between minority status and criminality and the interaction of minorities with criminal justice organizations will be analyzed. Characteristics of female offenders are surveyed and offender classification systems are reviewed for their relevance to understanding motivational and behavioral patterns of female offenders. This course will explore the response of police and court officials to women as victims of crimes and will examine employment opportunities for women and minorities in the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CJ 101

(3 credit hours) This course examines organizational and management theories as they apply to criminal justice agencies and organizations. Different management styles, practices, and problems are discussed. Also covered are the structure, purpose, and process of the criminal justice system and policy making in justice administration.

Prerequisites: CJ 101, 223, 224, 225, 226, 307, 308, 313, 315, 322, 380 and senior standing.

Principles of macroeconomics is a course designed to introduce students to basic principles of economic theory and policy. It presents economics as a systematic discipline that deals with the production and distribution of goods and services in a world with unlimited human aspirations but finite productive resources. The basic methods of thoughts and tools of analysis used by economists will be discussed. The student will be introduced to the important policy issues that make economics a lively and controversial field. This course has no prerequisites.
This course serves as an introduction to state and federal law and policy governing education systems. The course will explore historical and contemporary legal issues and their impact on student achievement and development of effective school practices, with focus on the role of the school principal, curriculum specialist, and district-level administrators.

This course will serve as an exploration of historical and current issues related to educational leadership, with an emphasis on legal and ethical issues including social justice, human rights, fairness, and equity. Students apply principles of leadership, ethics, and critical thinking while examining approaches to conceptualizing, interpreting, and making operational social justice.

(3.00 credit hours) This course emphasizes writing and reading as elements of active learning and critical thinking. ENGL 101E is intended for students who are almost eligible for regular ENGL 101 sections as well as those who are eligible. Additional Requirement of a Minimum of 10 Contact Hours of supplemental instruction for any student enrolled in the course with an ACT score below 18. Must be completed within the first 60 hours of college credit.

An introductory course, with emphasis on the process of preparing various technical documents as well as methods of research, especially in the library. May substitute for ENGL 102 for majors in the college of natural sciences and mathematics. Prerequisite: English 101 or equivalent

A study of poetry, fiction and drama. The course stresses basic themes and formal elements found in literature. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 placement.

First Year Experience is designed to help students develop the skills needed to be successful at WVSU and beyond. Course content includes developing college-level reading and study skills, career and major exploration, managing time and money wisely, building connections with faculty and students, awareness of campus and community resources, and increasing sensitivity to other cultures so students can effectively interact in an increasingly diverse and global community.

(3 Credit Hours) An introductory study of the discipline of health sciences, sports studies, health and physical education and the many factors that influence our health such as heredity, environment, health care services, and our own behavior. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of health education and health promotion to other disciplines, concepts of learning and behavior change, comprehensive school health programs, models and theories of human development and behavior with application to health education, competencies and skills of health educators, ethics, and current and future issues in health education. Students will also use the Internet to explore the various resources available to school and community health education/promotion specialists.

Designed to inform, interest and motivate students toward good health as it relates to effective, productive and satisfying living. We will look at health as a dynamic, ever-changing process of trying to achieve individual potential in the physical, mental, social, emotional, spiritual and environmental dimensions. 2 Credit Hours

(3 credit hours) Designed to acquaint the prospective teacher with the curriculum, process of concepts, goals, objectives, content, methodology, and evaluation development necessary to achieve desired health knowledge, attitudes, and practices in students.
This course is a study of the practical methods and strategies used when implementing health education and health promotion programs.

3 Credit Hour Course – This course will provide a detailed look into Needs and Capacity Assessment Strategies for Health Education and Health Promotion.

(3 Credit Hours) Problem solving, number systems, logic, consumer math, basic algebra and geometry, basic probability and statistics.

(3 credit hours) Linear and quadratic equations; radical expressions; polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear programming; input / output models; applications to business and economics.

(3 credit hours) Study of the tasks involved in the marketing of goods and services for both for-profit and nonprofit enterprises. Provides an overview of marketing mix decision requirements within a framework of contemporary economic, social, technological, competitive and regulatory influences.

Course Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202

This field-based practicum will allow candidates to apply knowledge of educational leadership, educational law and policy, change, innovation, professional development, financial and human resource management, and data-based decision making for school and district improvement.

(3 credit hours) An introduction to research methods in educational settings. This course will allow students to determine how data can be used to make instructional decisions at the classroom, building, and district level.

This course is a study of the basic rules of elements and their compounds. This allows you to develop an appreciation of the beauty of consumer chemistry. The course will involve a close look into the food we eat, the fuel we burn, and the products we use as health and beauty aids.

This course is an introduction to the development of an appreciation of art. Special emphasis is placed on methods, techniques, and terminology that relate to art as well as artists, cultures, and art movements throughout history.

Thomas Kiddie
Try new things in this course. There's no way to mess it up. 
This course primarily focuses on the research writing
process for a broad academic community. It covers basic
research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and nonelectronic
sources and techniques of formal writing.
Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking
skills. Prerequisite(s): ENGL101. Must be completed within
the first 60 hours of college credit.
The course covers mathematical concepts relevant to the application of quantitative techniques in business. The basic concepts of finite mathematics, linear programming, and mathematics of finance are the focal points. Many of the topics discussed will involve computer applications.
Prerequisite: Math 120 – College Algebra (Formerly Math 101)


Course Description from the University Catalog:  Course emphasis will be placed on recognition and special needs of students labeled exceptional according to state and federal regulations. Effective instructional strategies for teaching populations such as gifted, and students at risk for school failure, visually impaired, physically challenged, speech/language handicaps and behavior disorders will be studied. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 202 with a “C” or better or concurrent with EDUC 202. 

This course will serve as an overview of leadership theories and their application in the interest of school improvement. This is an introductory course in educational leadership. Focus will be on school and district level leaders and their roles in the learning process within the greater learning community.

This course prepares prospective educational leaders to administer various school programs for diverse student populations. Emphasis will be given to basic concepts, issues, regulations, problems and procedures in the management of special and compensatory education. Also included will be state and federal legislation and court decisions pertaining to special pupil populations and career and technology education.

This course serves as an introduction to state and federal law and policy governing education systems. The course will explore historical and contemporary legal issues and their impact on student achievement and development of effective school practices, with focus on the role of the school principal, curriculum specialist, and district-level administrators.

This course will serve as an exploration of historical and current issues related to educational leadership, with an emphasis on legal and ethical issues including social justice, human rights, fairness, and equity. Students apply principles of leadership, ethics, and critical thinking while examining approaches to conceptualizing, interpreting, and making operational social justice.

This field-based practicum will allow candidates to apply knowledge of educational leadership, educational law and policy, change, innovation, professional development, financial and human resource management, and data-based decision making for school and district improvement.

3 Credit Hours. The study and applications of formats, style and organizational patterns essential in various professions, with particular emphasis on correspondence, reports, research and audience analysis. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 102.

A study of science-based health facts and guidelines to enable consumers to intelligently select health products and services. The course will emphasize the economic aspects of health and the social and psychological factors that influence consumer choices