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Welcome!

If you are new to Moodle, take a look at our training course--Online Student Orientation: A Virtual Walk to Class--located in the navigation bar at the top of this screen. If you have questions about how to use Moodle, please stop by Wallace 222, send us an email at col@wvstateu.edu, or call us at 304-766-3300.

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About WVSU

Founded in 1891, West Virginia State University is a public, land-grant, historically black university, which has evolved into a fully accessible, racially integrated, and multi-generational institution.

The University, “a living laboratory of human relations,” is a community of students, staff, and faculty committed to academic growth, service, and preservation of the racial and cultural diversity of the institution.

With the goal of improving the quality of our students’ lives, as well as the quality of life for West Virginia’s citizens, the University forges mutually beneficial relationships with other educational institutions, businesses, cultural organizations, governmental agencies, and agricultural and extension partners.


Available courses

(3 credit hours) Linear and quadratic equations; radical expressions; polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear programming; input / output models; applications to business and economics.

This 3 Credit Hours course provides an introduction into the functional disciplines of Business Administration: Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing and Information Systems. The course provides a survey of the disciplines and will assist a student in choosing an area of concentration studies leading to a degree in Business Administration. The course will begin to build the skills necessary for a successful career in Business.

BA 203. Business Statistics An introduction to various statistical measures, including central tendency, variation and skewness. Emphasis is also placed on concepts and functions of probability theory, such as the use of binomial and normal distributions. Students will use computer applications to demonstrate their understanding of various concepts. Prerequisite(s): MATH 120.

The course covers mathematical concepts relevant to the application of quantitative techniques in business. The basic concepts of finite mathematics, linear programming, and mathematics of finance are the focal points. Many of the topics discussed will involve computer applications.
Prerequisite: Math 120 – College Algebra (Formerly Math 101)


(3 Credit Hours) An introduction to the financial accounting cycle from analyzing economic events to financial statement preparation and use. The course also includes a basic study of the accounting for corporate assets, liabilities, and equities, as well as financial statement analyses. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 and MATH 120.
This 3-credit hour course is a survey of managerial accounting and decision making. The economic ideas underlying managerial planning and decisions, accounting for the various manufacturing environments, basic budgeting, short-term decision making, and capital allocation represent the topics of coverage.
To introduce students to the basic concepts in the organization and management of institutions. Emphasis is placed on managing in a contemporary context including planning, organizing, leading, and controlling while adjusting to change and maintaining effective performance.
Analysis of the environment and the managerial functions of recruiting, employee assessments and development, retention, and employee relations with the enterprise, with emphasis on the relationships among people, on group interactions, on relations, and on relations between employers and employees.

(3 credit hours) The first in a three-course sequence providing students with a foundation in theory and a review of the accounting cycle, including preparing time-value money calculations and financial statements. The course includes an in-depth study of generally accepted accounting principles as they apply to cash, receivables and inventories. Comparisons with International Financial Reporting Standards will be introduced as appropriate.

Prerequisite: BA 216 with a grade of C or better.

(Credit hours: 4) A comprehensive, issues based examination of the Earth’s environment, and humanity’s impact on it. Students will complete group discussions on various topics in environmental biology, and a laboratory experience consisting of a series of independent problems in environmental biology, in addition to mastering the standard lecture material. Does not count toward a major in Biology.

This course is a study of the basic rules of elements and their compounds. This allows you to develop an appreciation of the beauty of consumer chemistry. The course will involve a close look at the food we eat, the fuel we burn, and the products we use as health and beauty aids.

Environmental chemistry is the study and appreciation of the phenomena in the environment. In this course we look at various environmental issues from the viewpoint of the chemist and look at the political implications as well. The study of various environmental factors and pollutants in our water, soil and air and their effects on the planet. Includes laboratory work.

A study of the various levels, roles, and functions of law enforcement in America. The nature and responsibilities of law enforcement are discussed and evaluated, including police accountability and civil liability. Examines the racial, ethnic, and gender issues in law enforcement.
This course presents a comprehensive overview of Corrections as a “system” and is a review of the philosophical and historical roots of punishment as well as contemporary developments. Particular attention will be paid to Twentieth Century developments and evolving trends in the Twenty-First Century. Prerequisite: CJ 101.
This course will provide students with a working knowledge of the major structures and basic legal concepts that underlie the Criminal Courts. The structure of the courts, the nature of the criminal law they apply, and the procedures followed by them will be examined along with the history of how they developed, and the goals they seek to achieve. The state and federal court systems will be examined. Prerequisite: CJ 101.

(Three Credit Hours) This course is designed to provide the instruction in the study of crimes, including major crimes, crimes against person, crimes against property, conspiracy, elements of proof, and the processes and procedures involved.

This course will serve as an overview of leadership theories and their application in the interest of school improvement. This is an introductory course in educational leadership. Focus will be on school and district level leaders and their roles in the learning process within the greater learning community.

This course focuses on using National, State, District and School data to improve teaching and learning, including improving the achievement of identified low-achieving groups.

Pre-requisites: Approved entry into the West Virginia State University’s Master’s in Instruction Educational leadership program.

(3 credit hours) An introduction to research methods in educational settings. This course will allow students to determine how data can be used to make instructional decisions at the classroom, building, and district level.

This field-based practicum will allow candidates to apply knowledge of educational leadership, educational law and policy, change, innovation, professional development, financial and human resource management, and data-based decision making for school and district improvement.

(3 credit hours) This is a practical course in action research. Students will conduct an action research project based on an identified need in a public school setting and present it to their peers.

An introductory course, with emphasis on the process of preparing various technical documents as well as methods of research, especially in the library. May substitute for ENGL 102 for majors in the college of natural sciences and mathematics. Prerequisite: English 101 or equivalent

The study and application of writing formats, styles, and organizational patterns essential in various professions, with particular emphasis on correspondence, reports, and research is the primary focus of this course. There is also a unit covering the writing of resumes and job application letters as well as suggestions for job hunting and interviewing. Prerequisite: English 102

First Year Experience is designed to help students develop the skills needed to be successful at WVSU and beyond. Course content includes developing college-level reading and study skills, career and major exploration, managing time and money wisely, building connections with faculty and students, awareness of campus and community resources, and increasing sensitivity to other cultures so students can effectively interact in an increasingly diverse and global community.

(3 Credit Hours) Problem solving, number systems, logic, consumer math, basic algebra and geometry, basic probability and statistics.

(3 credit hours) Linear and quadratic equations; radical expressions; polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear programming; input / output models; applications to business and economics.

(3 credit hours) Study of the tasks involved in the marketing of goods and services for both for-profit and nonprofit enterprises. Provides an overview of marketing mix decision requirements within a framework of contemporary economic, social, technological, competitive and regulatory influences.

Course Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202


(3 credit hours) This class will examine the meaning of literacy in the digital age by examining, through the lens of technical communication, various modes of composition. Through readings and on-line discussions, the course will explore theories of cultural convergence and how we produce and consume information. As students discover new technologies such as blogs, social media, Twitter, YouTube, Wikis, Podcasts, and others as they emerge, they will learn how to transform theory into practical application using the various media. While students are developing these functional literacies, they will also examine the technologies critically and rhetorically learning not only how to use a technology but why and when.

Prerequisite: ENGL 112: Technical Writing

(3 credit hours) Linear and quadratic equations; radical expressions; polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear programming; input / output models; applications to business and economics.

(3 Credit Hours) An introduction to the financial accounting cycle from analyzing economic events to financial statement preparation and use. The course also includes a basic study of the accounting for corporate assets, liabilities, and equities, as well as financial statement analyses. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 and MATH 120.

(Credit hours: 4) A comprehensive, issues based examination of the Earth’s environment, and humanity’s impact on it. Students will complete group discussions on various topics in environmental biology, and a laboratory experience consisting of a series of independent problems in environmental biology, in addition to mastering the standard lecture material. Does not count toward a major in Biology.

First Year Experience is designed to help students develop the skills needed to be successful at WVSU and beyond. Course content includes developing college-level reading and study skills, career and major exploration, managing time and money wisely, building connections with faculty and students, awareness of campus and community resources, and increasing sensitivity to other cultures so students can effectively interact in an increasingly diverse and global community.

This course is a study of the basic rules of elements and their compounds. This allows you to develop an appreciation of the beauty of consumer chemistry. The course will involve a close look into the food we eat, the fuel we burn, and the products we use as health and beauty aids.
Thomas Kiddie

An introduction to the basic technical and aesthetic elements of the art of film. The class will examine the nature of cinema and its relation to our culture and our lives through analysis of its many components

Try new things in this course. There's no way to mess it up. 

This is a lecture/discussion/creating course that starts with objects of art in the student’s environment and proceeds from the comfortable and familiar to the internationally accepted aesthetic. Periods of art history and cultures of the world will be examined. The student will be exposed to the basic concepts of art through the study of painting, sculpture, architecture, industrial art, fibers and film.

This course recognizes the growing cultural diversity in most modern organizations around the world in terms of clientele, human resources and ownership. To equip managers for the challenges of global demands, emphasis is on strategic, socio-cultural, behavioral, legal-political and ethical issues as well as on the functional aspects of international management. Prerequisite(s): BA 310.

This course focuses on using National, State, District and School data to improve teaching and learning, including improving the achievement of identified low-achieving groups.

Pre-requisites: Approved entry into the West Virginia State University’s Master’s in Instruction Educational leadership program.

(3 credit hours) An introduction to research methods in educational settings. This course will allow students to determine how data can be used to make instructional decisions at the classroom, building, and district level.

This field-based practicum will allow candidates to apply knowledge of educational leadership, educational law and policy, change, innovation, professional development, financial and human resource management, and data-based decision making for school and district improvement.

This course primarily focuses on the research writing process for a broad academic community. It covers basic research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and nonelectronic sources and techniques of formal writing. Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking skills. Prerequisite(s): ENGL101. Must be completed within the first 60 hours of college credit.

(3 Credit Hours]) A study of race and ethnic relations from a comparative perspective. The course includes a strong American component with emphasis on the experiences of such minorities as African-Americans, Hispanic Americans and Asian Americans. 

SOC 321. Sociology of Health and Medicine.  The course is an introduction to the sociology of health and medicine. Emphasis is on the relationship between social factors and health. The course will survey both the theory and practice of medicine in its social setting from a sociological perspective. Health and medicine are sociologically significant because they represent powerful social institutions with differential outcomes for people, based on their ability to access and compete for quality healthcare. Steady technological advances improve health and medicine but also add additional costs which can present challenges for some based on age, gender, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and other sociodemographic factors. The course addresses individual and group behaviors associated with assessing well-being and identifying and using strategies to maintain health. It addresses reaction to illness (real or perceived), interaction with health care delivery systems, and maximizing health, even when there is physiological or physical impairment or dysfunction.

An introductory course concerned with the working of the economy as a whole. Development of the theories of consumption, investment and equilibrium income; application of the theory to current macroeconomic problems; monetary and fiscal policy and its influence on economic activity.

This course provides an introduction to methods of research in criminal justice. Topics include research development based on hypotheses and theories, data collection and analysis, interpretation of results and evaluation of studies.

(3 credit hours) This course will introduce the student to the study of serial killers including the history and types of serial killers. The methodology of the investigative process involving profiling of serial killers as well as the many aspects of these types of homicide/murder investigations will be covered. To further enhance the student’s understanding of homicide/murder, this course will incorporate interdisciplinary knowledge from the fields of criminology, sociology, history, psychology and political science. (No prerequisites)

The course provides an introduction to the functional disciplines of Business Administration: Accounting, Finance, Management and Marketing. The course provides a survey of the disciplines and will assist a student in choosing an area of concentrated studies leading to a degree in Business Administration. The course will begin to build the skills necessary for a successful career in business.

A study of poetry, fiction and drama. The course stresses basic themes and formal elements found in literature. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 placement.

Comprehensive survey of the field, past and present, with emphasis on types and uses, including evaluation of books and the art of storytelling. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 102 and 150 or permission of the instructor. (3 Credit Hours)

This course primarily focuses on the research writing process for a broad academic community. It covers basic research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and nonelectronic sources and techniques of formal writing. Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking skills. Prerequisite(s): ENGL101. Must be completed within the first 60 hours of college credit.

Women’s Studies is interdisciplinary scholarship focused on women and gender. This introductory course presents students with the history of the women’s movement and analyses of women’s psychology, gender roles and life cycle as they affect and are affected by economics, law, religion, business, politics and the arts. The methodologies of feminist research and feminist theory are introduced. Women’s similarities as well as differences based on age, ability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic class and race and ethnicity are explored and analyzed within this framework. (3 Credit Hours)

A general survey of principles, theories and fields of psychology with emphasis on application. (Course is designed for the student who wishes to gain a greater understanding of human behavior, both adaptive and nonadaptive.) Prerequisite(s): eligibility for ENGL 101.

A combined lecture and studio course in which specific works from the past and present will be studied, analyzed, and used as a motivation for projects and discussion.

Designed to enhance your awareness of the visual world in which we live, this course will be a combination of lectures (visual presentations and films), discussions, and studio productions (your assignments and projects).

No prerequisites.

(3 Credit Hours) A practical humanistic approach to interpersonal, small group and public communications. Focus is on the communicative event and its context with special emphasis on communication principles and skills.
(3 Credit Hours) A survey course in mass communications with an emphasis
on print and broadcast media and their roles, responsibilities
and effects upon American society.
This is the current student athlete site for WV STATE U

This course is designed to explore how gender is constructed and how the pervasiveness of gender is a way of structuring social life. Sociology of gender involves both the study of femininities and masculinities, the cultural meaning associated with being women and men in our society, how gender influences the interaction between people, how the structures of our societal institutions, such as organization of work, and education create gendered meanings, and how the meaning of gender changes overtime. Prerequisite SOC 101 or permission of the instructor.

This course examines ways to preserve bat populations and habitats in suburban areas