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If you are new to Moodle, take a look at our training course--Online Student Orientation: A Virtual Walk to Class--located in the navigation bar at the top of this screen. If you have questions about how to use Moodle, please stop by Wallace 222, send us an email at col@wvstateu.edu, or call us at 304-766-3300.

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About WVSU

Founded in 1891, West Virginia State University is a public, land-grant, historically black university, which has evolved into a fully accessible, racially integrated, and multi-generational institution.

The University, “a living laboratory of human relations,” is a community of students, staff, and faculty committed to academic growth, service, and preservation of the racial and cultural diversity of the institution.

With the goal of improving the quality of our students’ lives, as well as the quality of life for West Virginia’s citizens, the University forges mutually beneficial relationships with other educational institutions, businesses, cultural organizations, governmental agencies, and agricultural and extension partners.


Available courses

(3 Credit Hours) This course will examine the multifaceted problem of crime victimization. It focuses on the incidence of criminal victimization, social characteristics of crime victims, and the treatment of the victim by the Criminal Justice System. It also examines the efforts designed to alleviate the consequences of criminal victimization and provide support for the victim. This course is 100% online using the learning management system (LMS) available by clicking the WVSU online option on the main webpage www.wvstateu.edu. All course material will be available to students online.

(3 Credit Hours)  This is a lecture/discussion/creating course that surveys objects of art in the student’s environment and proceeds from the comfortable and familiar to the international. The course uses lecture, discussion, and student participation to introduce the basic concepts of Art and Art History.

This 3 Credit Hours course provides an introduction into the functional disciplines of Business Administration: Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing and Information Systems. The course provides a survey of the disciplines and will assist a student in choosing an area of concentration studies leading to a degree in Business Administration. The course will begin to build the skills necessary for a successful career in Business.

The course covers mathematical concepts relevant to the application of quantitative techniques in business. The basic concepts of finite mathematics, linear programming, and mathematics of finance are the focal points. Many of the topics discussed will involve computer applications.
Prerequisite: Math 120 – College Algebra (Formerly Math 101)


An introduction to the financial accounting cycle from analyzing economic events to financial statement preparation and use. The course also includes a basic study of the accounting for corporate assets, liabilities, and equities, as well as financial statement analyses. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 and MATH 120.

(3 credit hours) Study of the tasks involved in the marketing of goods and services for both for-profit and nonprofit enterprises. Provides an overview of marketing mix decision requirements within a framework of contemporary economic, social, technological, competitive and regulatory influences.

Course Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202


Analysis of the environment and the managerial functions of recruiting, employee assessments and development, retention, and employee relations with the enterprise, with emphasis on the relationships among people, on group interactions, on relations, and on relations between employers and employees.

(3 Credit Hours) The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the behavior of employees at the individual, group and organizational levels. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of application and theory. Topics to be covered include: motivation, team building, perception, attitudes, communication, conflict, stress and leadership.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 102; Grade of C or better in BA 301.

An introduction to the federal taxation of individuals. This course is designed to introduce students to personal income tax procedures. A conceptual approach is emphasized. Specific topics will include but are not limited to: basic tax models, tax laws, tax computation, gross income, deductions, depreciation and ethics.

A study of accounting topics including business combinations consolidated financial statements, partnerships and international accounting. A comparison of generally accepted accounting principles with International Financial Reporting Standards as they apply to selected technical areas will be covered as appropriate.

(3 credit hours) A state-of-the-art study of the operations function. The main objective is to develop operations management abilities, focusing on strategic, global and service operations.
Prerequisites: BA 209 and BA 301.


(Credit hours: 4) A comprehensive, issues based examination of the Earth’s environment, and humanity’s impact on it. Students will complete group discussions on various topics in environmental biology, and a laboratory experience consisting of a series of independent problems in environmental biology, in addition to mastering the standard lecture material. Does not count toward a major in Biology.

(Credit hours: 4) A comprehensive, issues based examination of the Earth’s environment, and humanity’s impact on it. Students will complete group discussions on various topics in environmental biology, and a laboratory experience consisting of a series of independent problems in environmental biology, in addition to mastering the standard lecture material. Does not count toward a major in Biology.

Environmental chemistry is the study and appreciation of the phenomena in the environment. In this course we look at various environmental issues from the viewpoint of the chemist and look at the political implications as well. The study of various environmental factors and pollutants in our water, soil and air and their effects on the planet. Includes laboratory work.

A study of the law of juvenile delinquency and the administration of the juvenile justice system. Examines the historical development of the concept of delinquency, and the special status of juveniles before the law. Surveys the major theories of delinquency. Considers the legal processing of abuse, neglect and dependency cases.

This course presents a comprehensive overview of Corrections as a “system” and is a review of the philosophical and historical roots of punishment as well as contemporary developments. Particular attention will be paid to Twentieth Century developments and evolving trends in the Twenty-First Century. Prerequisite: CJ 101.

3 credit hours) Introduction to the concepts and methods of social science research: the role of theory in research, forming hypotheses and questions, identifying variables and gathering and analyzing statistical data. Emphasis will be on developing good writing skills, and using computers for basic statistical evaluation. This course meets the requirements of POSC 311 and SOC311.

This course will introduce undergraduate students to the role of research in our understanding of criminal justice and the criminal justice system. Emphasis will be placed on understanding different methods of research as well as the manner in which research should be conducted. Over the course of the semester, students will participate in class exercises to highlight the topics from the subject matter.

3 Credit Hours - This course is a continuation of CJ 320 and is designed to cover the issues related to the creation of written documentation in the three major components of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Students will be introduced to the various formats, styles, and organizational patterns commonly utilized in criminal justice reports and research. Students will become aware of the writing recommendations, guidelines, and accrediting requirements of criminal justice organizations. Emphasis is also placed upon professional writing skills; including report structure and construction, mechanics, grammar, and specific criminal justice vocabulary and usage.

This course focuses on the phenomenon of modern terrorism in the 20th and 21st centuries, around the world. The course includes a review of nations, movements and individuals who engage in terrorist violence. The effects of violence in terms of individuals, countries and the world are also discussed.

(Three Credit Hours) This course is designed to provide the instruction in the study of crimes, including major crimes, crimes against person, crimes against property, conspiracy, elements of proof, and the processes and procedures involved.

This course combines economic theory with geography to address critical problems of growth, distribution, and development, along with their impact on international business. It introduces the student to the global economy in an era of shifting borders, restructuring economies, and regional realignments. Recent geopolitical changes are vividly portrayed in a series of superb full-color maps and striking photographs.

Principles of macroeconomics is a course designed to introduce students to basic principles of economic theory and policy. It presents economics as a systematic discipline that deals with the production and distribution of goods and services in a world with unlimited human aspirations but finite productive resources. The basic methods of thoughts and tools of analysis used by economists will be discussed. The student will be introduced to the important policy issues that make economics a lively and controversial field. This course has no prerequisites.

(3 credit hours) This course explores change theory and its application to the school setting. Candidates will identify and explore emerging trends and issues in the change process with emphasis on sustaining innovation through reculturing and ongoing professional learning and development.

Prerequisites: Approved entry into the West Virginia State University’s Master’s in Instruction Educational leadership program.

(3 credit hours) The goal of this course is to prepare and equip educational leaders with the ability to examine critical issues related to providing leadership for diverse student populations. Educational leaders will understand what it means to be culturally responsive and learn strategies to rectify current race, class and gender inequities that exist throughout educational systems.

Prerequisites: Approved entry into the West Virginia State University’s Master’s in Instruction Educational leadership program. To facilitate learning, the instructor may alter the syllabus at any time during the course of the semester.

(3 credit hours) This course primarily focuses on the research writing process for a broad academic community. It covers basic research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and nonelectronic sources and techniques of formal writing. Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking skills.

An introductory course, with emphasis on the process of preparing various technical documents as well as methods of research, especially in the library. May substitute for ENGL 102 for majors in the college of natural sciences and mathematics. Prerequisite: English 101 or equivalent

(3 Credit Hours) This course helps students improve their writing by reviewing the rules of grammar, usage, and mechanics. Systematic attention is given to sentence construction, punctuation, spelling, vocabulary development, and self-help through effective use of the dictionary. Emphasis will be placed on the use of such skills in practical, everyday communication. (English 160 cannot be substituted for English 101 or 102.)

The study and application of writing formats, styles, and organizational patterns essential in various professions, with particular emphasis on correspondence, reports, and research is the primary focus of this course. There is also a unit covering the writing of resumes and job application letters as well as suggestions for job hunting and interviewing. Prerequisite: English 102

The study and application of writing formats, styles, and organizational patterns essential in various professions, with particular emphasis on correspondence, reports, and research is the primary focus of this course. There is also a unit covering the writing of resumes and job application letters as well as suggestions for job hunting and interviewing. Prerequisite: English 102

This course aims to prepare students comprehensively for editing tasks in technical and other professional environments by engaging students in various technical tasks including copy editing, compilation, document design and reorganization, and management and production of client projects. The course will cover methods for working in both a paper and in an electronic environment. This course assumes that the student has the foundations of technical or report writing, as taught in English 112, Technical Writing, and English 204, Writing for Business and Other Professions. Prerequisite: English 112 or English 204 or permission of the instructor.

First Year Experience is designed to help students develop the skills needed to be successful at WVSU and beyond. Course content includes developing college-level reading and study skills, career and major exploration, managing time and money wisely, building connections with faculty and students, awareness of campus and community resources, and increasing sensitivity to other cultures so students can effectively interact in an increasingly diverse and global community.

Designed to inform, interest and motivate students toward good health as it relates to effective, productive and satisfying living. We will look at health as a dynamic, ever-changing process of trying to achieve individual potential in the physical, mental, social, emotional, spiritual and environmental dimensions. 2 Credit Hours

(3 Credit Hours) This course reviews basic principles in epidemiology and designs of study for health research. Prerequisite(s): Math 111 or 120.

(3 Credit Hours) This course addresses the full scope of leadership and its challenges with special emphasis on leading within the healthcare environment. Prerequisite(s): HHP 454.


This field-based practicum will allow candidates to apply knowledge of educational leadership, educational law and policy, change, innovation, professional development, financial and human resource management, and data-based decision making for school and district improvement.

(1 Credit Hour) A course designed to prepare adult learners for the transition back into academic study. In addition to strengthening career and life goal development, students will acquire management skills, appreciate support systems, and develop a plan of study. This course addresses specific issues and theories related to adult learners.

This course will serve as an exploration of historical and current issues related to educational leadership, with an emphasis on legal and ethical issues including social justice, human rights, fairness, and equity. Students apply principles of leadership, ethics, and critical thinking while examining approaches to conceptualizing, interpreting, and making operational social justice.

3 Credit Hour Course – This course will provide a detailed look into Needs and Capacity Assessment Strategies for Health Education and Health Promotion.

(3 Credit Hours) Problem solving, number systems, logic, consumer math, basic algebra and geometry, basic probability and statistics.

(3 credit hours) Linear and quadratic equations; radical expressions; polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear programming; input / output models; applications to business and economics.

(3 credit hours) An introduction to research methods in educational settings. This course will allow students to determine how data can be used to make instructional decisions at the classroom, building, and district level.

This course is a study of the basic rules of elements and their compounds. This allows you to develop an appreciation of the beauty of consumer chemistry. The course will involve a close look into the food we eat, the fuel we burn, and the products we use as health and beauty aids.

This course is an introduction to the development of an appreciation of art. Special emphasis is placed on methods, techniques, and terminology that relate to art as well as artists, cultures, and art movements throughout history.

Thomas Kiddie
Try new things in this course. There's no way to mess it up. 

This course prepares prospective educational leaders to administer various school programs for diverse student populations. Emphasis will be given to basic concepts, issues, regulations, problems and procedures in the management of special and compensatory education. Also included will be state and federal legislation and court decisions pertaining to special pupil populations and career and technology education.

This is a lecture/discussion/creating course that starts with objects of art in the student’s environment and proceeds from the comfortable and familiar to the internationally accepted aesthetic. Periods of art history and cultures of the world will be examined. The student will be exposed to the basic concepts of art through the study of painting, sculpture, architecture, industrial art, fibers and film.

(3 Credit Hours) An introduction to basic oil and gas accounting. Topics include financial accounting, reporting and auditing issues in the upstream, midstream, marketing and trading, downstream and oilfield services sectors of the energy industry. Prerequisite: BA 216.

(3 Credit Hours) An overview of personal and family financial planning with an emphasis on financial record-keeping, planning your spending, tax planning, consumer credit, making buying decisions, purchasing insurance, selecting investments, and retirement and estate planning. 

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 and eligibility for MATH 111.


(3 credit hours) This course explores change theory and its application to the school setting. Candidates will identify and explore emerging trends and issues in the change process with emphasis on sustaining innovation through reculturing and ongoing professional learning and development.

Prerequisites: Approved entry into the West Virginia State University’s Master’s in Instruction Educational leadership program.

(3 credit hours) This course explores change theory and its application to the school setting. Candidates will identify and explore emerging trends and issues in the change process with emphasis on sustaining innovation through reculturing and ongoing professional learning and development.

Prerequisites: Approved entry into the West Virginia State University’s Master’s in Instruction Educational leadership program.

This course explores standard and emergent technologies related to effective instruction and administrative operations within a school. Reliable and effective web-based communication and modalities of e-learning are examined, including the development of a school technology plan. This course will provide students with both the theoretical and the practical considerations for planning and implementing technology in public education settings. This course is designed so that students will gain an understanding of the role of the principal in moving beyond short-term thinking and helping schools move forward with technology

This course focuses on applying information on school needs as well as knowledge of local, state, and national policy to effective management practices. Students will learn how to legally and effectively manage school operations, including management of financial and human resources and how to schedule for the effective use of time and physical resources. This is an intense eight-week program that will allow you to learn what policies, procedures and technologies are in place for you to develop the proper allocation of resources.

This course focuses on applying information on school needs as well as knowledge of local, state, and national policy to effective management practices. Students will learn how to legally and effectively manage school operations, including management of financial and human resources and how to schedule for the effective use of time and physical resources. This is an intense eight-week program that will allow you to learn what policies, procedures and technologies are in place for you to develop the proper allocation of resources.

(3 credit hours) The goal of this course is to prepare and equip educational leaders with the ability to examine critical issues related to providing leadership for diverse student populations. Educational leaders will understand what it means to be culturally responsive and learn strategies to rectify current race, class and gender inequities that exist throughout educational systems.

Prerequisites: Approved entry into the West Virginia State University’s Master’s in Instruction Educational leadership program. To facilitate learning, the instructor may alter the syllabus at any time during the course of the semester.

This field-based practicum will allow candidates to apply knowledge of educational leadership, educational law and policy, change, innovation, professional development, financial and human resource management, and data-based decision making for school and district improvement.

An introductory course, with emphasis on the process of preparing various technical documents as well as methods of research, especially in the library. May substitute for ENGL 102 for majors in the college of natural sciences and mathematics. Prerequisite: English 101 or equivalent