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If you are new to Moodle, take a look at our training course--Online Student Orientation: A Virtual Walk to Class--located in the navigation bar at the top of this screen. If you have questions about how to use Moodle, please stop by Wallace 222, send us an email at col@wvstateu.edu, or call us at 304-766-3300.

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About WVSU

Founded in 1891, West Virginia State University is a public, land-grant, historically black university, which has evolved into a fully accessible, racially integrated, and multi-generational institution.

The University, “a living laboratory of human relations,” is a community of students, staff, and faculty committed to academic growth, service, and preservation of the racial and cultural diversity of the institution.

With the goal of improving the quality of our students’ lives, as well as the quality of life for West Virginia’s citizens, the University forges mutually beneficial relationships with other educational institutions, businesses, cultural organizations, governmental agencies, and agricultural and extension partners.


Available courses

(3 Credit Hours) This course examines the nongovernmental, private-sector practice of protecting people, property, and information, conducting investigations, and otherwise safeguarding an organization’s assets, which may be performed for an organization by an internal department (proprietary security) or by an external, hired firm or individual (contract security). Prerequisites: C J 101, 223, 224, 225, 226, 307, and 308

This course examines ways to preserve bat populations and habitats in suburban areas

(3 credit hours) An introduction to research methods in educational settings. This course will allow students to determine how data can be used to make instructional decisions at the classroom, building, and district level.

This course will serve as an exploration of historical and current issues related to educational leadership, with an emphasis on legal and ethical issues including social justice, human rights, fairness, and equity. Students apply principles of leadership, ethics, and critical thinking while examining approaches to conceptualizing, interpreting, and making operational social justice.

3 Credit Hour Course – This course will provide a detailed look into Needs and Capacity Assessment Strategies for Health Education and Health Promotion.

(1 Credit Hour) A course designed to prepare adult learners for the transition back into academic study. In addition to strengthening career and life goal development, students will acquire management skills, appreciate support systems, and develop a plan of study. This course addresses specific issues and theories related to adult learners.

Analysis of the environment and the managerial functions of recruiting, employee assessments and development, retention, and employee relations with the enterprise, with emphasis on the relationships among people, on group interactions, on relations, and on relations between employers and employees.

An introduction to generally accepted auditing standards as they relate to profitoriented enterprises. Students use a computer practice set to demonstrate the technique of examining and documenting revenue and acquisition, conversion, investing and financial cycle reviews. Professional ethics and legal liability are emphasized. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in BA 363 and BA 364 or BA 365.

This course examines, from a comparative approach, the criminal justice field and profession as tradition, philosophy, and practice in criminal law, law enforcement, courts, and corrections, as it exists in a variety of countries and cultures around the world.

This course will serve as an overview of leadership theories and their application in the interest of school improvement. This is an introductory course in educational leadership. Focus will be on school and district level leaders and their roles in the learning process within the greater learning community.

This course prepares prospective educational leaders to administer various school programs for diverse student populations.  Emphasis will be given to basic concepts, issues, regulations, problems and procedures in the management of special and compensatory education. Also included will be state and federal legislation and court decisions pertaining to diverse pupil populations.


An introduction to the federal taxation of individuals. This course is designed to introduce students to personal income tax procedures. A conceptual approach is emphasized. Specific topics will include but are not limited to: basic tax models, tax laws, tax computation, gross income, deductions, depreciation and ethics

(3 credit hours) The first in a three-course sequence providing students with a foundation in theory and a review of the accounting cycle, including preparing time-value money calculations and financial statements. The course includes an in-depth study of generally accepted accounting principles as they apply to cash, receivables and inventories. Comparisons with International Financial Reporting Standards will be introduced as appropriate.

Prerequisite: BA 216 with a grade of C or better.

(3 Credit Hours) This course examines the nongovernmental, private-sector practice of protecting people, property, and information, conducting investigations, and otherwise safeguarding an organization’s assets, which may be performed for an organization by an internal department (proprietary security) or by an external, hired firm or individual (contract security). Prerequisites: C J 101, 223, 224, 225, 226, 307, and 308

This course serves as an introduction to state and federal law and policy governing education systems. The course will explore historical and contemporary legal issues and their impact on student achievement and development of effective school practices, with focus on the role of the school principal, curriculum specialist, and district-level administrators.

An exploration of historical and current issues related to educational leadership, with an emphasis on legal and ethical issues including social justice, human rights, fairness and equity. This course is designed to provide advanced exposure to current research and practice in leading for equity and inclusion within professional educational settings. This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of leadership, ethics, and critical thinking examining various approaches to conceptualizing, interpreting, and making operational social justice. The course design includes a review of the historical development of the concept of social justice in an interdisciplinary manner. The course will provide students with a strong conceptual foundation in leadership theories that enhance equity in terms of access, student outcomes, and institutional culture, with an emphasis on application of leadership approaches to real world administrative settings in educational and human service contexts. The orientation of the course is toward enabling individuals to reflect on their personal thoughts, development, and moral practice, to determine ethical frameworks from which their decisions are influenced, and to analyze and critique social issues in various contexts. The course is practice oriented and utilizes class discussion, personal reflections, and case studies in leadership to prepare students for taking actions in their own practice that promote equity and inclusion.

Introduction, definitions, social forces, classifications and sources of civil law. Fundamental principles of commercial law which relate to common business transactions and occurrences based upon contractual agreements. Theoretical and practical emphasis on the rights, duties, powers and privileges incident to oral and written contracts. Analysis of the essential elements of a valid and enforceable contract. Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENGL 101. (This course fulfills the General Education requirement in American Traditions)

(3 credit hours) An introduction to the federal taxation of individuals. This course is designed to introduce students to personal income tax procedures. A conceptual approach is emphasized. Specific topics will include but are not limited to: basic tax models, tax laws, tax computation, gross income, deductions, depreciation and ethics

(3 credit hours) This course focuses on applying information on school needs as well as knowledge of local, state, and national policy to effective management practices. Students will learn how to legally and effectively manage school operations, including management of financial and human resources and how to schedule for the effective use of time and physical resources. This is an intense eight-week program that will allow you to learn what policies, procedures and technologies are in place for you to develop the proper allocation of resources.

3 Credit Hour Course – An examination of the broad and challenging profession of community health education with an emphasis on communities and their health status. The course will also address the social/political reasons why many community health problems continue to exist.

(Three Credit Hours) This course is designed to provide the instruction in the study of crimes, including major crimes, crimes against person, crimes against property, conspiracy, elements of proof, and the processes and procedures involved.

(3 Credit Hours)  This is a lecture/discussion/creating course that surveys objects of art in the student’s environment and proceeds from the comfortable and familiar to the international. The course uses lecture, discussion, and student participation to introduce the basic concepts of Art and Art History.

This 3 Credit Hours course provides an introduction into the functional disciplines of Business Administration: Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing and Information Systems. The course provides a survey of the disciplines and will assist a student in choosing an area of concentration studies leading to a degree in Business Administration. The course will begin to build the skills necessary for a successful career in Business.

BA 203. Business Statistics An introduction to various statistical measures, including central tendency, variation and skewness. Emphasis is also placed on concepts and functions of probability theory, such as the use of binomial and normal distributions. Students will use computer applications to demonstrate their understanding of various concepts. Prerequisite(s): MATH 120.

Introduction, definitions, social forces, classifications and sources of civil law. Fundamental principles of commercial law which relate to common business transactions and occurrences based upon contractual agreements. Theoretical and practical emphasis on the rights, duties, powers and privileges incident to oral and written contracts. Analysis of the essential elements of a valid and enforceable contract. Prerequisite(s): Eligible for ENGL 101. (This course fulfills the General Education requirement in American Traditions)

A survey of managerial accounting and decision making. The economic ideas underlying managerial planning and decisions, accounting for the various manufacturing environments, basic budgeting, short-term decision making, and capital allocation represent the managerial accounting topics covered. Cash flow analysis and the use of financial ratios in financial statement analysis will also be covered.

3 Credit Hours - To introduce students with the basic concepts in the organization and management of institutions.  Emphasis is placed on managing in a contemporary context including planning, organizing, leading, and controlling while adjusting to change and maintaining effective performance.

(3 credit hours) Study of the tasks involved in the marketing of goods and services for both for-profit and nonprofit enterprises. Provides an overview of marketing mix decision requirements within a framework of contemporary economic, social, technological, competitive and regulatory influences.

Course Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202

Analysis of the environment and the managerial functions of recruiting, employee assessments and development, retention, and employee relations with the enterprise, with emphasis on the relationships among people, on group interactions, on relations, and on relations between employers and employees.

(3 credit hours) This course embraces the conceptual and practical problems associated with the financial management of the nonfinancial corporation. Topics covered, in brief, are an analysis of fund commitments to current assets, short-term financing, evaluation and choice of capital assets, the principle issues of debt/equity mix, investment policy and divided policy as they influence the market value of corporate claims.

Prerequisite: BA 216 and 209. (Note: BA 216 may be taken concurrently with permission of instructor.)

(3 Credit Hours) An introduction to the financial accounting cycle from analyzing economic events to financial statement preparation and use. The course also includes a basic study of the accounting for corporate assets, liabilities, and equities, as well as financial statement analyses. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 and MATH 118, 118E, or 120.

3 Credit Hours)The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the behavior of employees at the individual, group and organizational levels. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of application and theory. Topics to be covered include: motivation, teambuilding, perception, attitudes, communication, conflict, stress and leadership. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 102; Grade of C or better in BA 301.

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BA 363

This 3-credit hour course is the second in a three-course sequence designed to provide the student with a foundation in the theoretical concepts underlying the preparation of financial statements. The course includes an in-depth study of generally accepted accounting principles as they apply to selected technical areas. Comparisons with International Financial Reporting Standards will be introduced as appropriate.

A comprehensive, issues based examination of the Earth’s environment, and humanity’s impact on it. Students will complete group discussions on various topics in environmental biology, and a laboratory experience consisting of a series of independent problems in environmental biology, in addition to mastering the standard lecture material. Does not count toward a major in Biology. 

This course will teach some theories and the supporting evidence related to them concerning the following biological topics:

• The fundamental nature of life • The chemical and physical nature of living systems

• The flow of energy through living systems

• The dynamic nature of the environment • The organization of living systems in the natural world and their interrelations with each other and the environment

• Human relationships to the natural world

These topics do not comprise the whole of environmental science. The field is very broad and deep and cannot be covered in a single course. The selection of these topics represents a Page 3 of 17 compromise intended to develop a background of insight and understanding which will prepare you to confront some of the important environmental issues of our time.

Environmental chemistry is the study and appreciation of the phenomena in the environment. In this course we look at various environmental issues from the viewpoint of the chemist and look at the political implications as well. The study of various environmental factors and pollutants in our water, soil and air and their effects on the planet. Includes laboratory work.

A study of the various levels, roles, and functions of law enforcement in America. The nature and responsibilities of law enforcement are discussed and evaluated, including police accountability and civil liability. Examines the racial, ethnic, and gender issues in law enforcement.

This course will provide students with a working knowledge of the major structures and basic legal concepts that underlie the Criminal Courts. The structure of the courts, the nature of the criminal law they apply, and the procedures followed by them will be examined along with the history of how they developed, and the goals they seek to achieve. The state and federal court systems will be examined. Prerequisite: CJ 101.

3 credit hours) Introduction to the concepts and methods of social science research: the role of theory in research, forming hypotheses and questions, identifying variables and gathering and analyzing statistical data. Emphasis will be on developing good writing skills, and using computers for basic statistical evaluation. This course meets the requirements of POSC 311 and SOC311.

This course will introduce undergraduate students to the role of research in our understanding of criminal justice and the criminal justice system. Emphasis will be placed on understanding different methods of research as well as the manner in which research should be conducted. Over the course of the semester, students will participate in class exercises to highlight the topics from the subject matter.

This course offers the foundational strategies, skills, and tools of therapeutic interviewing along with an understanding of the formats and settings in which they will be working. It will also cover general principles of effective interviewing and provide students with the skills and techniques for achieving various interview goals, with an emphasis on counseling interviews and the establishment of helping relationships.

3 Credit Hours - This course is a continuation of CJ 320 and is designed to cover the issues related to the creation of written documentation in the three major components of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Students will be introduced to the various formats, styles, and organizational patterns commonly utilized in criminal justice reports and research. Students will become aware of the writing recommendations, guidelines, and accrediting requirements of criminal justice organizations. Emphasis is also placed upon professional writing skills; including report structure and construction, mechanics, grammar, and specific criminal justice vocabulary and usage.

(Three Credit Hours) This course is designed to provide the instruction in the study of crimes, including major crimes, crimes against person, crimes against property, conspiracy, elements of proof, and the processes and procedures involved.

Principles of macroeconomics is a course designed to introduce students to basic principles of economic theory and policy. It presents economics as a systematic discipline that deals with the production and distribution of goods and services in a world with unlimited human aspirations but finite productive resources. The basic methods of thoughts and tools of analysis used by economists will be discussed. The student will be introduced to the important policy issues that make economics a lively and controversial field. This course has no prerequisites.

(3 credit hours) This course explores change theory and its application to the school setting. Candidates will identify and explore emerging trends and issues in the change process with emphasis on sustaining innovation through reculturing and ongoing professional learning and development.

Prerequisites: Approved entry into the West Virginia State University’s Master’s in Instruction Educational leadership program.

(3 credit hours) The goal of this course is to prepare and equip educational leaders with the ability to examine critical issues related to providing leadership for diverse student populations. Educational leaders will understand what it means to be culturally responsive and learn strategies to rectify current race, class and gender inequities that exist throughout educational systems.

Prerequisites: Approved entry into the West Virginia State University’s Master’s in Instruction Educational leadership program. To facilitate learning, the instructor may alter the syllabus at any time during the course of the semester.

(3 credit hours) This is a practical course in action research. Students will conduct an action research project based on an identified need in a public school setting and present it to their peers.

(3 credit hours) This course primarily focuses on the research writing process for a broad academic community. It covers basic research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and nonelectronic sources and techniques of formal writing. Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking skills.

An introductory course, with emphasis on the process of preparing various technical documents as well as methods of research, especially in the library. May substitute for ENGL 102 for majors in the college of natural sciences and mathematics. Prerequisite: English 101 or equivalent

The study and application of writing formats, styles, and organizational patterns essential in various professions, with particular emphasis on correspondence, reports, and research is the primary focus of this course. There is also a unit covering the writing of resumes and job application letters as well as suggestions for job hunting and interviewing. Prerequisite: English 102

The study and application of writing formats, styles, and organizational patterns essential in various professions, with particular emphasis on correspondence, reports, and research is the primary focus of this course. There is also a unit covering the writing of resumes and job application letters as well as suggestions for job hunting and interviewing. Prerequisite: English 102

This course aims to prepare students comprehensively for editing tasks in technical and other professional environments by engaging students in various technical tasks including copy editing, compilation, document design and reorganization, and management and production of client projects. The course will cover methods for working in both a paper and in an electronic environment. This course assumes that the student has the foundations of technical or report writing, as taught in English 112, Technical Writing, and English 204, Writing for Business and Other Professions. Prerequisite: English 112 or English 204 or permission of the instructor.

(3 credit hours) This class will examine the meaning of literacy in the digital age by examining, through the lens of technical communication, various modes of composition. Through readings and on-line discussions, the course will explore theories of cultural convergence and how we produce and consume information. As students discover new technologies such as blogs, social media, Twitter, YouTube, Wikis, Podcasts, and others as they emerge, they will learn how to transform theory into practical application using the various media. While students are developing these functional literacies, they will also examine the technologies critically and rhetorically learning not only how to use a technology but why and when.

Prerequisite: ENGL 112: Technical Writing

First Year Experience is designed to help students develop the skills needed to be successful at WVSU and beyond. Course content includes developing college-level reading and study skills, career and major exploration, managing time and money wisely, building connections with faculty and students, awareness of campus and community resources, and increasing sensitivity to other cultures so students can effectively interact in an increasingly diverse and global community.

Designed to inform, interest and motivate students toward good health as it relates to effective, productive and satisfying living. We will look at health as a dynamic, ever-changing process of trying to achieve individual potential in the physical, mental, social, emotional, spiritual and environmental dimensions. 2 Credit Hours

(3 Credit Hours) This course reviews basic principles in epidemiology and designs of study for health research. Prerequisite(s): Math 111 or 120.

(3 Credit Hours) This course addresses the full scope of leadership and its challenges with special emphasis on leading within the healthcare environment. Prerequisite(s): HHP 454.

(3 Credit Hours) Problem solving, number systems, logic, consumer math, basic algebra and geometry, basic probability and statistics.

(3 Credit Hours) A study of the law of juvenile delinquency and the administration of the juvenile justice system. Examines the historical development of the concept of delinquency, and the special status of juveniles before the law. Surveys the major theories of delinquency. Considers the legal processing of abuse, neglect and dependency cases.

This 3 Credit Hours course explores the many dimensions of new venture creation and growth and to foster innovation and new business formations in independent and corporate settings. We will be concerned with content and process questions as well as with formulation and implementation issues that relate to conceptualizing, developing and managing successful new ventures

This 3 Credit Hours course provides an introduction into the functional disciplines of Business Administration: Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing and Information Systems. The course provides a survey of the disciplines and will assist a student in choosing an area of concentration studies leading to a degree in Business Administration. The course will begin to build the skills necessary for a successful career in Business.

(3 Credit Hours)  This is a lecture/discussion/creating course that surveys objects of art in the student’s environment and proceeds from the comfortable and familiar to the international. The course uses lecture, discussion, and student participation to introduce the basic concepts of Art and Art History.

This course examines ways to preserve bat populations and habitats in suburban areas

(3 credit hours) A course designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of how a free-market economy works as individuals make microeconomic decisions of their own based on cost-benefit principle. Discussions of the cyclical nature of GDP production, joblessness, cost of living, interest rates, public debt and deficits will be included.

This course is a study of the basic rules of elements and their compounds. This allows you to develop an appreciation of the beauty of consumer chemistry. The course will involve a close look into the food we eat, the fuel we burn, and the products we use as health and beauty aids.

This course is an introduction to the development of an appreciation of art. Special emphasis is placed on methods, techniques, and terminology that relate to art as well as artists, cultures, and art movements throughout history.

Thomas Kiddie
Try new things in this course. There's no way to mess it up. 

This course focuses on using National, State, District and School data to improve teaching and learning, including improving the achievement of identified low-achieving groups.

Pre-requisites: Approved entry into the West Virginia State University’s Master’s in Instruction Educational leadership program.

(3 credit hours) This course explores change theory and its application to the school setting. Candidates will identify and explore emerging trends and issues in the change process with emphasis on sustaining innovation through reculturing and ongoing professional learning and development.

Prerequisites: Approved entry into the West Virginia State University’s Master’s in Instruction Educational leadership program.

(3 credit hours) This course explores change theory and its application to the school setting. Candidates will identify and explore emerging trends and issues in the change process with emphasis on sustaining innovation through reculturing and ongoing professional learning and development.

Prerequisites: Approved entry into the West Virginia State University’s Master’s in Instruction Educational leadership program.

This course focuses on applying information on school needs as well as knowledge of local, state, and national policy to effective management practices. Students will learn how to legally and effectively manage school operations, including management of financial and human resources and how to schedule for the effective use of time and physical resources. This is an intense eight-week program that will allow you to learn what policies, procedures and technologies are in place for you to develop the proper allocation of resources.

(3 Credit Hours) An overview of personal and family financial planning with an emphasis on financial record-keeping, planning your spending, tax planning, consumer credit, making buying decisions, purchasing insurance, selecting investments, and retirement and estate planning. 

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 and eligibility for MATH 111.


(1 - 6 Credit Hours) Placement of business students in various businesses and industries in the community for the purpose of gaining onthe-job training and experience. (Graded on Pass-Fail basis except in teacher education. This course fulfills the academic capstone requirement for Business Education majors.) 

Prerequisite(s): Completion of minimum of 90 semester hours and the approval of the supervising instructor and department chair.


(1 - 6 Credit Hours) Placement of business students in various businesses and industries in the community for the purpose of gaining onthe-job training and experience. (Graded on Pass-Fail basis except in teacher education. This course fulfills the academic capstone requirement for Business Education majors.) 

Prerequisite(s): Completion of minimum of 90 semester hours and the approval of the supervising instructor and department chair.


(3 credit hours) This course will introduce the student to the study of serial killers including the history and types of serial killers. The methodology of the investigative process involving profiling of serial killers as well as the many aspects of these types of homicide/murder investigations will be covered. To further enhance the student’s understanding of homicide/murder, this course will incorporate interdisciplinary knowledge from the fields of criminology, sociology, history, psychology and political science. (No prerequisites)

(3 Credit Hours) An introduction to the basic technical and aesthetic elements of the art of film. The class will examine the nature of cinema and its relation to our culture and our lives through analysis of its many components.

(3 Credit Hours) A junior-level course designed for a topic of special current interest, including televised courses. 

Prerequisite(s): COMM 101, 170, 241 or consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours.


This course focuses on using National, State, District and School data to improve teaching and learning, including improving the achievement of identified low-achieving groups.

Pre-requisites: Approved entry into the West Virginia State University’s Master’s in Instruction Educational leadership program.

This course focuses on using National, State, District and School data to improve teaching and learning, including improving the achievement of identified low-achieving groups.

Pre-requisites: Approved entry into the West Virginia State University’s Master’s in Instruction Educational leadership program.

(3 credit hours) An introduction to research methods in educational settings. This course will allow students to determine how data can be used to make instructional decisions at the classroom, building, and district level.

This field-based practicum will allow candidates to apply knowledge of educational leadership, educational law and policy, change, innovation, professional development, financial and human resource management, and data-based decision making for school and district improvement.

This field-based practicum will allow candidates to apply knowledge of educational leadership, educational law and policy, change, innovation, professional development, financial and human resource management, and data-based decision making for school and district improvement.

(3 credit hours) This is a practical course in action research. Students will conduct an action research project based on an identified need in a public school setting and present it to their peers.

(3 Credit Hours) This course primarily focuses on the research writing process for a broad academic community. It covers basic research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and nonelectronic sources and techniques of formal writing. Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking skills. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101.


(3 Cedit Hours) This course primarily focuses on the research writing process for a broad academic community. It covers basic research inquiry, use of the library with electronic and nonelectronic sources and techniques of formal writing. Attention is given to argumentation and critical thinking skills. 

Prerequisite(s): ENGL101. Must be completed within the first 60 hours of college credit.

(3 Credit Hours) A study of poetry, fiction and drama. The course stresses basic themes and formal elements found in literature. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 placement.

([2 Credit Hours]) This course will examine the development of competition in the human condition from its inception, into organized forms of sport, to the highly developed enterprise that has emerged in contemporary times. Observations of the influence of culture and history on this development are central to the presentation and content of this course.



(2 credit hours) This course provides an introductory examination. Learning and practice of the coaching profession including philosophy development, practice planning, communication and safety concerns. This course serves as an entry level coaching course and is an additional required course in several states for individuals to coach at the high school level. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be certified by the NFHS. This course is not sufficient alone to coach sports at the middle school or high school level in the state of West Virginia. Prerequisite(s): HHP 140 and PSYC 151, or SOC 101 with a C or better in each course.

                      


(3 Hours) This course is designed to prepare the student with the personal training knowledge, skills, and abilities set forth by the NSCA. Emphasis on course content will be in nutrition and the role of personal trainer, latest guidelines for client assessment, flexibility training, cardiovascular exercise prescription, stability ball training, and periodization training. The course will also address exercise prescription with special populations, aerobic and anaerobic exercise techniques, and resistance training load. The course will also familiarize and enable the student to be able to instructor in the NSCA standards of exercise and fitness protocols standards and protocols set forth by the department of education in its physical fitness component.

(3 Hours) This course is designed to prepare the student with the strength and conditioning knowledge, skills, and abilities set forth by the NSCA. Emphasis on course content will be in nutrition and the role of the strength specialist, latest guidelines for fitness assessment, flexibility training, cardiovascular exercise prescription, Olympic weightlifting, and periodization training. The course will also address exercise prescription with specific athletic populations. The course will also familiarize and enable the student to be able to instruct in the NSCA standards of exercise and fitness protocols set forth by the department of education in its physical fitness component.


(3 Credit Hours). An introduction to the basic technical and aesthetic elements of the art of film. The class will examine the nature of cinema and its relation to our culture and our lives through analysis of its many components. 

(3 Credit Hours) This course includes an intensive study of the use of research methods in psychology. Additional topics include ethics, effective library utilization, professional writing and oral presentations. Students devise individual research projects to develop necessary skills in these areas. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 151, 175, 200 or permission of instructor.

(3 credit hours) This course will introduce the student to the study of serial killers including the history and types of serial killers. The methodology of the investigative process involving profiling of serial killers as well as the many aspects of these types of homicide/murder investigations will be covered. To further enhance the student’s understanding of homicide/murder, this course will incorporate interdisciplinary knowledge from the fields of criminology, sociology, history, psychology and political science. (No prerequisites)